Andreessen wasn't paying attention at key meeting – MS exec

Please sir, he was doing his email instead... Please sir...


MS on Trial Netscape co-founder Marc Andreessen couldn't have taken accurate notes of the infamous 'browser carve-up' meeting of 1995 because he was doing his email instead, claims Microsoft exec Dan Rosen. Andreessen's notes of the meeting, where Netscape alleges Microsoft offered a deal whereby MS got the Windows browser market and Netscape the rest, are crucial evidence in the DoJ's case. Microsoft has hotly denied that it ever made such an offer, and has also denied (less convincingly, given Bill Gates suggests it in an email) that it offered to take a stake in Netscape. Rosen was at the meeting, and says no such offer was made. But he also says Andreessen's notes can't be accurate, because the feckless youth wasn't paying attention. He was sending, reading and replying to emails. If true, this is pretty rum conduct for a senior exec of a hot-shot company in the midst of a major summit with a rival/potential partner. And wasn't the meeting held at Microsoft premises? If so, Marc must have asked for access to a phone line, which is even more bizarre conduct. So a Register appeal. Any readers who received email from Marc Andreessen on 21 June 1995, please come forward. Alternatively, Microsoft can prove the truth of Rosen's claims simply by subpoenaing the relevant emails and comparing their send times with the meeting schedule. ® Complete Register trial coverage


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