Apple offers open source for Mac OS X Server

But for the moment, the company is pursuing a twin track strategy


Apple is going open source with its new server software, but as we predicted yesterday (Apple trails open source), it's going carefully. Mac OS X Server was released yesterday at $499, almost half the price previously intended, but at the same time Steve Jobs announced that the source code, dubbed Darwin, would be available free for developers. OS X Server itself will be available in traditional Apple mode for the G3 Server, but the software will also run on other Macs. Jobs however is presenting it effectively as Unix - this isn't entirely a surprise, as servers Apple has sold in the past have run Unix, but Jobs did make the point that OS X Server doesn't run client Mac apps. Which, as we suggested, allows him to go public with the source while maintaining close control of the Mac itself. And quite a bit of what Apple's giving away is open source already. Darwin includes the foundation layer for Mac OS X Server, plus the Mach microkernel, BSD 4.4 and the Apache Web server. The launch was supported open source guru Eric Raymond, who was enthusiastic but suggested, ominously, that "now we'd like to see more." This will present Apple with an interesting challenge when it ships the client version of Mac OS X in Q3 or Q4. That software will have to run Mac applications, and at that point it will become more apparent that Apple is busily embracing open source while simultaneously holding onto key proprietary elements. Unless of course the OS X Server experiment is wildly successful. Apple is clearly testing the water with Darwin, and may go further if the temperature turns out to be favourable. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Zendesk sold to private investors two weeks after saying it would stay public
    Private offer 34 percent above share price is just the thing to change minds

    Customer service as-a-service vendor Zendesk has announced it will allow itself to be acquired for $10.2 billion by a group of investors led by private equity firm Hellman & Friedman, investment company Permira, and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority.

    The decision is a little odd, in light of the company's recent strategic review, announced on June, which saw the board unanimously conclude "that continuing to execute on the Company's strategic plan as an independent, public company is in the best interest of the Company and its stockholders at this time."

    That process saw Zendesk chat to 16 potential strategic partners and ten financial sponsors, including a group of investors who had previously expressed conditional interest in acquiring the company. Zendesk even extended its discussions with some parties but eventually walked away after "no actionable proposals were submitted, with the final bidders citing adverse market conditions and financing difficulties at the end of the process."

    Continue reading
  • Singapore promises 'brutal and unrelentingly hard' action on dodgy crypto players
    But welcomes fast cross-border payments in central bank digital currencies

    In the same week that it welcomed the launch of a local center of excellence focused on crypto-inspired central bank digital currencies, Singapore's Monetary Authority (MAS) has warned crypto cowboys they face a rough ride in the island nation.

    The center of excellence (COE) was established by the Mojaloop Foundation – an open source effort to create payment platforms to make digital financial services accessible to those access to banks. The COE aims to "accelerate financial inclusion in emerging markets" through hackathons, workshops and pilot projects while examining expanded CBDCs payment capabilities."

    Singapore's sovereign wealth fund has invested in Mojaloop, and MAS chief fintech officer Sopnendu Mohanty serves as a board advisor and the authority provides representatives to the Foundation's working group, alongside folks from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Google, and more.

    Continue reading
  • Software-defined silicon is coming for telecom kit later this year
    Startup EdgeQ believes pay-for-what-you-use model will make 5G transition more cost-effective

    Interview While the IT industry waits to see if and when Intel will introduce software-defined silicon in Xeon CPUs, one startup us is moving ahead with plans to bring a pay-for-what-you-use pricing model to the telecom market with its "base station-on-a-chip" later this year.

    Silicon Valley-based EdgeQ, which is led by Qualcomm and Intel executives, announced last week that it has begun sampling an EdgeQ-based 5G small cell and OpenRAN PCIe accelerator card for base stations with telecom operators and equipment makers.

    Things are apparently moving smoothly enough for the startup that Adil Kidwai, EdgeQ's head of product management, told The Register that its RISC-V-based chip will appear in mass-manufactured products like small cells and base station accelerator cards "by the end of this year."  

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022