Intel to slash P4 prices 28 Jan

Plus ca change...c'est si bon


Roadmap The latest roadmap Intel has showed its customers reveals that it will take the axe to prices of its 1.4 and 1.5 Pentium 4s on 28 January 2001.

At the same time it will release the 1.3GHz Pentium 4 at a price of $409, and cut the price of its 1GHz Pentium III from $465 to $348.

The 1.5 P4 will cost $644, and the 1.4 P4 will cost $440. On the 10th of December, the 1.4GHz Pentium 4 dropped to $574, as reported here.

Meanwhile, the 28th of January also means a drop in the price of mobile Pentium IIIs, with the launch of the 900MHz at $722, while the 850MHz, the 800MHz and the 750MHz mobile parts drop to 508, 348, and 268 dollars respectively. This takes advantage of better bin splits, Intel is telling its customers.

Expect 850MHz/900MHz Celerons in Q3/Q4 of 2001 respectively.*

Intel is preparing the ground for its Northwood launch by offering Willamette (P4) frequency parity between the 478 and the 423 pin packaging now in Q3, in preparation for a launch at over 2GHz in Q4 next year.

This is slower than many expected. The Tualatin cache size for desktops has changed to 256K. Brookdale DDR support is now expected in Q1 of 2002, while in Q2 of next year Intel will intro an 815B-Step chipset to allow Tualatin support. SDRAM support for Brookdale is predicted to arrive in Q3 next year.

The Tehama-E name, we reported from Taiwan earlier this year, has now been dropped.

Q3 is the Tualatin Q next year, when we shall see lots of product intros from Chipzilla.

There's a lot more of this sort of stuff, but we'll let you chew over that lot over the weekend first. ®

* This is corrected from an earlier version, where we suggested Q1 for these processors. Apologies for the confusion. Look out for an update on the Celeron platform this week. (MM)


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