ATI Radeon 2, 3 details leak

Big things coming


Some interesting components to ATI's Radeon roadmap appear to have leaked out of the company.

The information centres on the upcoming Radeon 2 - aka the R200 -and the rather further off Radeon 3, codenamed the R300, according to the eUniverse Games Web site.

According to the site, ATI will offer samples of the Radeon 2 this month before going into mass production in September, fabbed at 0.15 micron, presumably for an October release just in time for Christmas. A cut-down version of the part, codenamed RV200, aimed at the low-end of the market will sample and ship in the same timeframe.

The Radeon 2 (R200) will boast four rendering pipelines, run at 250MHz and be capable of operating in parallel with a second chip to allow ATI to offer a Radeon 2 MAXX card. The R200 will support AGP 4x and DirectX 8.1.

The low-end RV200 - the Radeon 2 VE? - is pretty much the same, but will support only two rendering pipelines and presumably won't be operable in MAXX configurations.

The next-but-one-generation R300 will offer up to eight parallel rendering pipelines, powered by a 300MHz, 0.15 micron core. Designed for DirectX 9, It will sample in August, so it could ship this time next year. Value and what looks like a mobile version will sample in Q4.

All five parts will offer ATI's HydraVision multi-display technology.

These timeframes mark something of a slide from the previous ATI roadmap data we saw, which had the Radeon 2 shipping or sampling late 2000, with a MAXX version arriving a few months later and a 400MHz, 0.15 micron Radeon 2 Pro making an appearance summer 2001.

The timings aren't right, but the details of each part are pretty close in both 'leaks' - consistent enough to suggest a degree of authenticity. That said, eUniverse Games cites no source - anonymous or otherwise - for the information. ®

Related Link

eUniverse Games: ATI Next Generation Chips Info

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ATI revamps Radeon roadmap


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