Yahoo! execs should do time for Kiddie! Porn!

Sez DoJ prosecutor turned family crusader


The executives of Yahoo! belong in jail as kiddie porn kingpins, former US Department of Justice (DoJ) prosecutor turned family-values crusader Patrick Trueman says.

"A search of Yahoo!'s Clubs and GeoCities sites, which are available to anyone including children, indicates that a seemingly endless number of the sites contain pornography, depicting children in a variety of sexual poses and involved in sex acts," he declared in a recent American Family Association (AFA) press release. (emphasis original)

Trueman is urging US Attorney General John Ashcroft to launch an investigation in hopes that Yahoo! principals can be made examples with criminal penalties under federal obscenity laws.

Ashcroft has long been on the record as a pornography opponent, though he's not taken any independent action against it in his role as Attorney General.

The AFA is betting he'll buckle to publicity which implies that he's not living up to expectations, though we have to point out that he's obligated to prosecute the law impartially, not according to his personal agenda or that of a few like-minded activists.

Trueman claims that anyone can find on Yahoo! such areas as the "Pic Club of Preteens," the "Preteen Pics up the Wazoo" Club, and references to other sites where child pornography can be found. One Yahoo! Club offers the "Complete Lolita Hookers Guide," he says.

In spite of recent cutbacks in digital hardcore porn on offer, Yahoo! continues to be "a magnet for pedophiles and those seeking all varieties of hardcore pornography," he warns.

We tried a simple, brief search at Yahoo!, confining our results to Yahoo! groups, on the term 'preteen pics' and came up with nothing. A search outside Yahoo brought up zillions of sites elsewhere, chiefly in Japan and Russia. A search on just 'preteen' confined to Yahoo! brought up a large selection of harmless areas for children, and no porn.

We think Trueman is blowing smoke for media consumption, and has next to nothing to back it up. Even if he did find several KP-ish site or group names at Yahoo!, most Web sites with names like the ones he lists are nothing more than mouse-trapping popup dungeons trying to sell hardcore pics of retired sex workers frolicking in school uniforms.

Trueman now serves as AFA's director of governmental affairs. He served as chief of the DoJ Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section During the Bush Senior Administration. ®


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