DIY DSL goes live

Low key


Today marks the official commercial launch of BT Wholesale's DIY "wires only" DSL service.

The service is cheaper to use than existing DSL products and doesn't require an engineer to install the product.

Many people in the industry are keeping their fingers crossed that DIY DSL might just do the trick and deliver a much-needed boot up the backside for broadband.

Then again, maybe it won't ... today's launch is very much a low-key affair.

BT Wholesale seems content to stay silent on the subject while BT's ISP, BTopenworld, does not have a self-install product in place. "We're still assessing the impact of the trial," said a spokesman for the ISP.
However, it will be announcing details of its DIY offering later in the month.

AOL UK is still trialling its service with several hundred of its subscribers. According to a spokesman, the trial is going well, although the ISP still needs to complete its assessment of the technology before making any decisions.

Freeserve, too, is still trialling the product and will release further details "in due course".

A handful of ISPs have launched commercial services for self install DSL.

Sheffield-based PlusNet, among others, is offering the service for £35.25 a month plus an activation fee of £58.75.

And Bucks-based Nildram is charging £50 to activate the service with a monthly subscription of £39.

However, critics warn that despite today's launch the service is still too expensive for mass-market consumers. ®

Related Story

Broadband use in UK to triple next year
ISPs queue up for DIY ADSL
Cost of ADSL to fall with DIY install

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Ubuntu 21.10: Plan to do yourself an Indri? Here's what's inside... including a bit of GNOME schooling

    Plus: Rounded corners make GNOME 40 look like Windows 11

    Review Canonical has released Ubuntu 21.10, or "Impish Indri" as this one is known. This is the last major version before next year's long-term support release of Ubuntu 22.04, and serves as a good preview of some of the changes coming for those who stick with LTS releases.

    If you prefer to run the latest and greatest, 21.10 is a solid release with a new kernel, a major GNOME update, and some theming changes. As a short-term support release, Ubuntu 21.10 will be supported for nine months, which covers you until July 2022, by which point 22.04 will already be out.

    Continue reading
  • Heart FM's borkfast show – a fine way to start your day

    Jamie and Amanda have a new co-presenter to contend with

    There can be few things worse than Microsoft Windows elbowing itself into a presenting partnership, as seen in this digital signage for the Heart breakfast show.

    For those unfamiliar with the station, Heart is a UK national broadcaster with Global as its parent. It currently consists of a dozen or so regional stations with a number of shows broadcast nationally. Including a perky breakfast show featuring former Live and Kicking presenter Jamie Theakston and Britain's Got Talent judge, Amanda Holden.

    Continue reading
  • Think your phone is snooping on you? Hold my beer, says basic physics

    Information wants to be free, and it's making its escape

    Opinion Forget the Singularity. That modern myth where AI learns to improve itself in an exponential feedback loop towards evil godhood ain't gonna happen. Spacetime itself sets hard limits on how fast information can be gathered and processed, no matter how clever you are.

    What we should expect in its place is the robot panopticon, a relatively dumb system with near-divine powers of perception. That's something the same laws of physics that prevent the Godbot practically guarantee. The latest foreshadowing of mankind's fate? The Ethernet cable.

    By itself, last week's story of a researcher picking up and decoding the unintended wireless emissions of an Ethernet cable is mildly interesting. It was the most labby of lab-based demos, with every possible tweak applied to maximise the chances of it working. It's not even as if it's a new discovery. The effect and its security implications have been known since the Second World War, when Bell Labs demonstrated to the US Army that a wired teleprinter encoder called SIGTOT was vulnerable. It could be monitored at a distance and the unencrypted messages extracted by the radio pulses it gave off in operation.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021