SGI shoots the messenger

3D patent transfer undeniable


According to our favourite Chinese proverb: "When the finger points at the moon, the idiot points at the finger."

Well, SGI still won't return our calls, but it has sanctioned its marketing staff to roam online fora to diss The Register.

Over at Vis-Sim.org one Juliana Slye - a product manager at SGI - does her best to rubbish our story about the transfer of 3D graphics patents to Microsoft, but forgetfully, omits to add a denial.

As well she might, because the story's true.

"Puhlease," she begins. "The Register is the closest thing you can get to a computational version of the National Enquirer."

Whatever that means. But go on, Jules:

"And as far as 'the sources close to Mountain View' line goes....that's like people who talked to 'my best friend's sister's brother's buddy's mother's friend's dog' to get the exclusive' on whether or not some celebrity is anorexic."

No it isn't, love. It means we're protecting our sources.

Hold your breath for the denial that follows:

"I'm not going to comment about the msoft deal, so don't bother baiting me."

Oh.

And that's it.

This little flounce gets shredded by subsequent posters:

"Calling [The Register] a 'computational version of the National Enquirer' is like calling you an 'SGI PR windbag, let's refrain from both," writes one.

"The disgraceful part is that I know you know that this story is true," adds another.

"Almost everyone in graphics at SGI knows this story is true, so why attack the Register over publishing the truth? It shows a complete lack of integrity."

Perhaps the financial analysts can glean more from management at tomorrow's earnings conference. Even if they don't, we'll be able to see the proof in the coming months as the filings show up in the US Patent Office's database. Perhaps we should mark each one with a special commemorative prize.

Any suggestions, dear readers? ®

Related Story

SGI transfers 3D patents to Microsoft


Other stories you might like

  • US won’t prosecute ‘good faith’ security researchers under CFAA
    Well, that clears things up? Maybe not.

    The US Justice Department has directed prosecutors not to charge "good-faith security researchers" with violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) if their reasons for hacking are ethical — things like bug hunting, responsible vulnerability disclosure, or above-board penetration testing.

    Good-faith, according to the policy [PDF], means using a computer "solely for purposes of good-faith testing, investigation, and/or correction of a security flaw or vulnerability."

    Additionally, this activity must be "carried out in a manner designed to avoid any harm to individuals or the public, and where the information derived from the activity is used primarily to promote the security or safety of the class of devices, machines, or online services to which the accessed computer belongs, or those who use such devices, machines, or online services."

    Continue reading
  • Intel plans immersion lab to chill its power-hungry chips
    AI chips are sucking down 600W+ and the solution could be to drown them.

    Intel this week unveiled a $700 million sustainability initiative to try innovative liquid and immersion cooling technologies to the datacenter.

    The project will see Intel construct a 200,000-square-foot "mega lab" approximately 20 miles west of Portland at its Hillsboro campus, where the chipmaker will qualify, test, and demo its expansive — and power hungry — datacenter portfolio using a variety of cooling tech.

    Alongside the lab, the x86 giant unveiled an open reference design for immersion cooling systems for its chips that is being developed by Intel Taiwan. The chip giant is hoping to bring other Taiwanese manufacturers into the fold and it'll then be rolled out globally.

    Continue reading
  • US recovers a record $15m from the 3ve ad-fraud crew
    Swiss banks cough up around half of the proceeds of crime

    The US government has recovered over $15 million in proceeds from the 3ve digital advertising fraud operation that cost businesses more than $29 million for ads that were never viewed.

    "This forfeiture is the largest international cybercrime recovery in the history of the Eastern District of New York," US Attorney Breon Peace said in a statement

    The action, Peace added, "sends a powerful message to those involved in cyber fraud that there are no boundaries to prosecuting these bad actors and locating their ill-gotten assets wherever they are in the world."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022