Gun auction site shut down by disk disaster

EMC fires back


Updated Online auction site GunBroker.com is recovering after its "worst two days" ever were spent repairing the damage when its EMC disk array, which is supposed to guarantee 100 pe rcent uptime, failed.

A message on the site details the travails GunBroker.com went through when its arrays went titsup last weekend.

"It took EMC 24 hours to get it back online, and when they got it back online they corrupted our database," the message states. "Although we have tape backup the tape runs at regular intervals and the crash occurred at the worst possible time. Everyone here worked 48 hours straight to restore the damaged data as fully as possible."

Having invested heavily in its infrastructure, GunBroker.com is keen to discover why its EMC disc arrays failed and what it needs to do in order to avoid any repetition of the problem.

GunBroker.com has apologised to its customers about its outage and advised them to check recent auctions to make sure their listing or bid are still there. It has extended auctions and waived the final value fee on items listed between Monday and Wednesday this week for its business users. ®

Update

EMC disputes this version of events and says its systems were not responsible for the outage. The storage giant said that Gunbroker.com does not own an EMC array or any other EMC system.

“Gunbroker.com outsources most of its IT operations to a service provider, an EMC customer, which experienced the January 18 data centre outage,” EMC PR manager Greg Eden said in a prepared statement.

“While EMC customer service was involved in diagnosing the problems experienced by the service provider, EMC storage systems were not the cause of the outage,”

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