EFF urges support for Philips' stand on protected CDs

Tell Philips you love them...


The Electronic Frontier Foundation has issued an Action Alert urging people to support Philips' stand against audio CDs which use anti-copying systems. Last month Philips set the cat among the pigeons by insisting CDs be clearly marked as such, and that they should not bear the familiar Compact Disc logo, because effectively they weren't.

Under the slogan "You buy it, you own it!" the EFF is describing these such CDs as "dysfunctional," and being sold under false pretences. "Consumers are buying CDs in a record store or online, paying full price for what they believe is a normal CD, only to return home to discover that the CD won't play on their computers, in their cars and even on certain other CD components. Because corrupt CDs may bear the 'CD' trademark and are sold alongside ordinary CDs, consumers are being fooled into purchasing inferior products."

The EFF says consumers need to "reward the manufacturers and technologies that stand up to protect consumers' rights," and encourages them to: "Let Philips know that you appreciate their decision to stand with their customers and protect their rights. Urge them to continue protecting the good name of the CD label and, at a minimum, to require that:
"1. dysfunctional CDs not be labelled as CDs;
"2. dysfunctional CDs be segregated from real CDs in record stores and online stores, so that consumers won't be confused;
"3. consumer electronics manufacturers be free to develop devices that play untainted CDs and work around defects of dysfunctional CDs."

Destination addresses, a sample letter and guidance (no foul language) are available at the EFF link above. EFF Action Alerts are issued regularly on subjects of interests to the organisation, and are intended to help coordinate activism and/or to mail-bomb unlovable companies, agencies and legislators. ®


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