Widescreen TV gunman shoots himself in the head – twice

A bit extreme, perhaps


Update A gunman who took hostages in the Rembrandttoren office complex in Amsterdam today, shot himself in the head - twice. Yes, he's dead. His hostages are safe, so all's well that ends well.

The gunman was protesting about the quality of his widescreen TV, which he was "forced" to buy because movies showed black borders on olde TVs. He was thought to have explosives also.

What else? Dutch psychiatrists suspect that Mr. Angry Widescreen man had a mental disorder, a case of stating the bleeding obvious.

We have had tales from readers based in Amsterdam of chaotic travel scenes in the city today. The Rembrandttoren, Amsterdam's highest building at 135m, is located next to a train and underground station, which was closed today.

Thank-you, Edwin Rots, for the following translation of the statement made by Mr. Angry Widescreen to NOS, the Dutch state broadcaster:

The bit from the NOS site reads:
In een verwarde fax aan het NOS-Journaal laat de man weten zich te verzetten tegen "de manipulatie door de verkopers van breedbeeldtelevisies". Volgens de man maken die zich schuldig aan het verkopen van "creatieve onzin".

This translates roughly as: In a fax to NOS news, the man indicates his displeasure with "manipulation by resellers of widescreen televisions". The man claims they are guilty of selling "creative nonsense".

The entertaining bit here (by the way) is that the man has been putting up signs like "Kleisterlee lies" and "We mislead" indicating that his target was Philips Electronics.

However, Philips moved out of the Rembrandt tower last summer and is now located next door in the Breitner tower. .

Oops. ®


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