Transmeta gets new CEO

Perry to lead low-power processor firm


Transmeta yesterday appointed Matthew R. Perry as its president and chief executive officer.

Perry, 39, succeeds Murray A. Goldman as chief executive officer and Hugh Barnes as president. Goldman, 64, will continue to serve as Transmeta's chairman and Barnes retains his seat on the company's board.

Perry served as vice president and general manager at Cirrus Logic from April 1998 to April 2002, during which period he managed, in succession, Cirrus' Embedded Processors Division, Crystal Products Division and Optical Products Division. Before that, he held management positions at AMD and Motorola, and was an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering at Texas Tech University.

He also serves on the board of directors of the Consumer Electronics Association, to which he was appointed in January 2002. ®

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