Go Daddy offers anonymous domain registration

No spam, No slam


ComputerWire: IT Industry Intelligence

A new sister company of Go Daddy Software Inc is to start offering internet users anonymous domain name registration from today, becoming the first major domain name registrar to do so,

Kevin Murphy writes

.

Go Daddy founder Bob Parsons has set up Domains By Proxy Inc, essentially a Go Daddy reseller that will enter its own contact information, rather than the registrant's, into the Whois database, whenever a registration is made.

The idea is to offer people who wish to publish anonymously online a means to do so without having their home address, email address and telephone number available publicly. The service would be useful equally to people concerned about spam as those that have personal reasons for not connecting their real life with their web site.

"Go Daddy is not withholding registrant information," Parsons told ComputerWire. "Domains By Proxy is purchasing the domain, then giving the customer the full benefits of ownership." The service will likely cost $5 to $10 more than a regular registration with Go Daddy, Parsons said, though pricing had not been confirmed at press time.

He said that registrants enter an agreement that allows them to do anything with a domain they could do if they owned it, including sell or transfer it, but they don't actually own it officially. If registrants do anything bad with the domain, such as provide illegal pornography or send out spam, they lose the benefits of anonymity.

The Internet Corp for Assigned Names and Numbers mandates that all accredited domain registrars provide complete and accurate contact information in all their Whois database entries. This obligation is backed strongly by the intellectual property lobby, which likes to be able to notify people of trademark or copyright infringements online.

According to Parsons, users who sign up for the service still have to abide by ICANN's Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy, which is used to settle disputes over trademarks in domain names. Anonymity can be withdrawn if a trademark infringement occurs, but it was not immediately clear how DBP determines infringement.

In addition, Domains By Proxy may be protected by two layers of removal from the ICANN accreditation contract. First, Go Daddy, which has the contractual relationship with ICANN, is a separate company from DBP. Second, officially it is DBP that "owns" the domain, and therefore must provide its contact details.

"It was not necessary to get ICANN's approval," Parsons said. "There are no violations of ICANN's rules or policy." An ICANN spokesperson agreed that, at first glance, DBP does not appear to be doing anything wrong. ICANN is looking more closely to make sure, the spokesperson said.

The service will have the added benefit for Go Daddy of protecting a portion of its registration base against the predatory tactics of competing registrars. At least three registrars currently stand accused of data mining Whois to find the addresses of their competitors' customers, for the purposes of luring them away.

Users of the service can have email sent to the address in the Whois forwarded to them, and can even have DBP act as a snail-mail proxy, for an additional fee. Parsons said the company has patents pending on the technology behind the service.

© ComputerWire


Other stories you might like

  • DuckDuckGo tries to explain why its browsers won't block some Microsoft web trackers
    Meanwhile, Tails 5.0 users told to stop what they're doing over Firefox flaw

    DuckDuckGo promises privacy to users of its Android, iOS browsers, and macOS browsers – yet it allows certain data to flow from third-party websites to Microsoft-owned services.

    Security researcher Zach Edwards recently conducted an audit of DuckDuckGo's mobile browsers and found that, contrary to expectations, they do not block Meta's Workplace domain, for example, from sending information to Microsoft's Bing and LinkedIn domains.

    Specifically, DuckDuckGo's software didn't stop Microsoft's trackers on the Workplace page from blabbing information about the user to Bing and LinkedIn for tailored advertising purposes. Other trackers, such as Google's, are blocked.

    Continue reading
  • Despite 'key' partnership with AWS, Meta taps up Microsoft Azure for AI work
    Someone got Zuck'd

    Meta’s AI business unit set up shop in Microsoft Azure this week and announced a strategic partnership it says will advance PyTorch development on the public cloud.

    The deal [PDF] will see Mark Zuckerberg’s umbrella company deploy machine-learning workloads on thousands of Nvidia GPUs running in Azure. While a win for Microsoft, the partnership calls in to question just how strong Meta’s commitment to Amazon Web Services (AWS) really is.

    Back in those long-gone days of December, Meta named AWS as its “key long-term strategic cloud provider." As part of that, Meta promised that if it bought any companies that used AWS, it would continue to support their use of Amazon's cloud, rather than force them off into its own private datacenters. The pact also included a vow to expand Meta’s consumption of Amazon’s cloud-based compute, storage, database, and security services.

    Continue reading
  • Atos pushes out HPC cloud services based on Nimbix tech
    Moore's Law got you down? Throw everything at the problem! Quantum, AI, cloud...

    IT services biz Atos has introduced a suite of cloud-based high-performance computing (HPC) services, based around technology gained from its purchase of cloud provider Nimbix last year.

    The Nimbix Supercomputing Suite is described by Atos as a set of flexible and secure HPC solutions available as a service. It includes access to HPC, AI, and quantum computing resources, according to the services company.

    In addition to the existing Nimbix HPC products, the updated portfolio includes a new federated supercomputing-as-a-service platform and a dedicated bare-metal service based on Atos BullSequana supercomputer hardware.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022