Kiosks charge phones on the go

Plug and glow


Mobile phone users could soon be able to charge their handsets at kiosks if a trial beginning next month proves successful. London-based Nearplay Systems has launched Charge Me, which allows punters to charge up their mobile phone or PDA while out and about.

The service costs 50p for five minutes or £1 for ten minutes - will be trialled in central London from next month in venues including Victoria and Waterloo stations, and Heathrow Airport. Nearplay is negotiating to roll-out these booths throughout the UK and Europe.

Each kiosk can handle up to 12 phones at one time. The idea is that you plug your phone in, pays your money, and it charges up your device. The kiosk can currently charge Nokia, Ericsson, Motorola, Siemens, Sony, Samsung and Palm devices.

Of course, you might find that while looking for one of these booths, it might be simpler to use a payphone. ®

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Wash your mouth out with shape-shifting metal
    You wanted flying cars and robo-butlers. Instead, we're getting tooth-cleaning morphing nanoparticle bots

    Experts in chemistry, dentistry, and engineering have developed a way to electromagnetically control iron oxide nanoparticles to clean plaque on human teeth.

    In an article published recently in the journal ACS Nano, University of Pennsylvania researchers Min Jun Oh, Alaa Babeer, Yuan Liu, Zhi Ren, Jingyu Wu, David A. Issadore, Kathleen J. Stebe, Daeyeon Lee, Edward Steager, and Hyun Koo describe a "magnetic field-directed assembly of nanoparticles into surface topography-adaptive robotic superstructures (STARS)" for removing dental plaque (biofilms) and detecting pathogens.

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for other uses. As the paper explains, they have both catalytic and magnetic properties. They catalyze hydrogen peroxide for an antimicrobial effect and they can be manipulated via magnetic fields.

    Continue reading
  • Apple's latest security feature could literally save lives
    Cupertino is so sure of Lockdown Mode it's offering $2m to bug hunters to break it

    Apple's latest security feature won't be used by most of its customers, but those who need Lockdown Mode could find it to be a literal life saver.

    The functionality, coming with iOS/iPadOS 16 and macOS Ventura, dramatically shrinks an iDevice's attack surface by disabling many of its features. It's designed to protect the small number of Apple users who, "because of who they are or what they do, may be personally targeted by some of the most sophisticated digital threats, such as those from NSO Group and other private companies developing state-sponsored mercenary spyware," Apple said in a statement. 

    Lockdown, thus, effectively reduces the number of potential vulnerabilities spyware could exploit to compromise a device, cutting the possible routes into surveillance targets' kit.

    Continue reading
  • Has Intel gone too far with its Ohio fab 'delay' stunt?
    With construction unceremoniously underway, x86 giant may have overplayed its hand

    COMMENT The way Intel has been talking about the status of its $20 billion Ohio fab project, you would be forgiven if you assumed that construction on the Midwest mega-site has been delayed in light of Congress struggling to pass a large subsidies package that would support new American chip factories.

    When Intel delayed a groundbreaking ceremony for the Ohio manufacturing site two weeks ago out of frustration over the subsidies inaction, some headlines may have given you the impression the semiconductor giant was putting off construction entirely.

    However, an Intel spokesperson made it clear to The Register and others at the time that the start date for construction had not changed.

    Continue reading
  • Hive ransomware gang rapidly evolves with complex encryption, Rust code
    RaaS malware devs have been busy bees

    The Hive group, which has become one of the most prolific ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS) operators, has significantly overhauled its malware, including migrating the code to the Rust programming language and using a more complex file encryption process.

    Researchers at the Microsoft Threat Intelligence Center (MSTIC) uncovered the Hive variant while analyzing a change in the group's methods.

    "With its latest variant carrying several major upgrades, Hive also proves it's one of the fastest evolving ransomware families, exemplifying the continuously changing ransomware ecosystem," the researchers said in a write-up this week.

    Continue reading
  • What do you mean your exaflop is better than mine?
    Gaming the system was fine for a while, now it's time to get precise about precision

    Comment A multi-exaflop supercomputer the size of your mini-fridge? Sure, but read the fine print and you may discover those performance figures have been a bit … stretched.

    As more chipmakers bake support for 8-bit floating point (FP8) math into next-gen silicon, we can expect an era of increasingly wild AI performance claims that differ dramatically from the standard way of measuring large system performance, using double-precision 64-bit floating point or FP64.

    When vendors shout about exascale performance, be aware that some will use FP8 and some FP64, and it's important to know which is being used as a metric. A computer system that can achieve (say) 200 peta-FLOPS of FP64 is a much more powerful beast than a system capable of 200 peta-FLOPS at just FP8.

    Continue reading
  • Meta's AI translation breaks 200 language barrier
    Open source model improves translation of rarer spoken languages by 70%

    Meta's quest to translate underserved languages is marking its first victory with the open source release of a language model able to decipher 202 languages.

    Named after Meta's No Language Left Behind initiative and dubbed NLLB-200, the model is the first able to translate so many languages, according to its makers, all with the goal to improve translation for languages overlooked by similar projects. 

    "The vast majority of improvements made in machine translation in the last decades have been for high-resource languages," Meta researchers wrote in a paper [PDF]. "While machine translation continues to grow, the fruits it bears are unevenly distributed," they said. 

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022