Pseudonymous blogging safe (for now)

Stalkers' corner


A right wing columnist and Paul Krugman-obsessive has abandoned his legal threat to unmask a popular pseudonymous weblogger.

The threat by author Donald Luskin was pretty explicit, and characterized as a SLAPP (Strategic Litigation Against Public Participation) action, the prime purpose of which is to deter criticism.

A 'joint statement' posted on Atrios' Eschaton weblog notes that "Mr Luskin is retracting his demand letter of October 29, 2003. We congratulate each other on having quickly achieved an amicable resolution. We are both glad to have put this behind us."

Although the identity of the Philly-based weblogger is surely known to Mrs Atrios, it remains a popular mystery. Guesses have included former Clinton press aide and journalist Sidney Bluementhal and even Paul Krugman himself.

Thanks to a reader for suggesting a truly anonymous weblog. Written in Python, Invisiblog uses GPG public key encryption and the Mixmaster anonymous remailer networks. So it's entirely software libre, too.

And don't forget, you can read advice on sending your own anonymous tips here.

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