PalmOne mulls other OS choices – report

Loves Nokia. True


Vesey Crichton, PalmOne's European chief, has suggested that the handheld company is open to considering other operating systems - and praised Nokia for "fantastic" work in promoting its phone platforms.

Palm OS isn't viewed internally as a religion, Chrichton told Swedish handheld magazine Allt om Handdatorer. He says that Nokia/Symbian connectivity isn't quite as good as it should be, which is a bit of an understatement.

PalmOne is the hardware side of Palm Computing and now formally incorporates Handspring. Neither Palm nor Handspring has ever produced a non-Palm OS device, although in the past Handspring CEO and Palm founder Jeff Hawkins has expressed his impatience with Palm's progress in modernizing the operating system his team wrote in the mid 1990s. The former software side of Palm, PalmSource, recently released version 6.0, the biggest overhaul in the history of the operating system - although you wouldn't know it from the company's web page, which only mentions version 5.0.

Funnily enough, the web site also prominently features the Fossil watch - which was abandoned recently.

In Europe, PalmOne has seen its leadership in the shrinking PDA market taken by HP.

PalmOne won't be short of suitors. Candidates include two Symbian-based offerings - Nokia's Series 60 and UIQ - Linux and - although it seems unthinkable - Microsoft's Smartphone platform. But a few years ago, it was unthinkable that Psion would be promoting Windows CE as its primary operating system, as it is now.

In the past Nokia and Palm collaborated on a project to put Palm's user interface onto a Symbian core, and Symbian and Palm once talked vaguely of releasing joint roadmaps. Such talk was buried as the PDA company geared up for an IPO. At one stage Palm even evaluated Linux as the foundation for future devices, but couldn't convince the lawyers that GPL software was a safe bet, and wound up buying Be's development team. Motorola has since validated Linux on smartphones.

How serious PalmOne really is about becoming a platform-agnostic hardware company remains to be seen: but such remarks will surely make its negotiations with PalmSource's licensing division all the more interesting.

PalmOne laid off 100 staff last week as a result of the Handspring merger. But it has a hit on its hands with the well-received Treo 600 and can't make enough of them. ®

Related Stories

PalmSource stealth releases OS milestone
Smartphones outsell PDAs 2:1
PalmOne to axe 12% of workforce
Palm 'mulled Linux' for next-gen OS

Related Products
Visit our Palm, Sony & Handspring Department

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • A peek into Gigabyte's GPU Arm for AI, HPC shops
    High-performance platform choices are going beyond the ubiquitous x86 standard

    Arm-based servers continue to gain momentum with Gigabyte Technology introducing a system based on Ampere's Altra processors paired with Nvidia A100 GPUs, aimed at demanding workloads such as AI training and high-performance compute (HPC) applications.

    The G492-PD0 runs either an Ampere Altra or Altra Max processor, the latter delivering 128 64-bit cores that are compatible with the Armv8.2 architecture.

    It supports 16 DDR4 DIMM slots, which would be enough space for up to 4TB of memory if all slots were filled with 256GB memory modules. The chassis also has space for no fewer than eight Nvidia A100 GPUs, which would make for a costly but very powerful system for those workloads that benefit from GPU acceleration.

    Continue reading
  • GitLab version 15 goes big on visibility and observability
    GitOps fans can take a spin on the free tier for pull-based deployment

    One-stop DevOps shop GitLab has announced version 15 of its platform, hot on the heels of pull-based GitOps turning up on the platform's free tier.

    Version 15.0 marks the arrival of GitLab's next major iteration and attention this time around has turned to visibility and observability – hardly surprising considering the acquisition of OpsTrace as 2021 drew to a close, as well as workflow automation, security and compliance.

    GitLab puts out monthly releases –  hitting 15.1 on June 22 –  and we spoke to the company's senior director of Product, Kenny Johnston, at the recent Kubecon EU event, about what will be added to version 15 as time goes by. During a chat with the company's senior director of Product, Kenny Johnston, at the recent Kubecon EU event, The Register was told that this was more where dollars were being invested into the product.

    Continue reading
  • To multicloud, or not: Former PayPal head engineer weighs in
    Not everyone needs it, but those who do need to consider 3 things, says Asim Razzaq

    The push is on to get every enterprise thinking they're missing out on the next big thing if they don't adopt a multicloud strategy.

    That shove in the multicloud direction appears to be working. More than 75 percent of businesses are now using multiple cloud providers, according to Gartner. That includes some big companies, like Boeing, which recently chose to spread its bets across AWS, Google Cloud and Azure as it continues to eliminate old legacy systems. 

    There are plenty of reasons to choose to go with multiple cloud providers, but Asim Razzaq, CEO and founder at cloud cost management company Yotascale, told The Register that choosing whether or not to invest in a multicloud architecture all comes down to three things: How many different compute needs a business has, budget, and the need for redundancy. 

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022