Nachi variant wipes MyDoom from PCs

Virus War gets really confusing


A new variant of the Nachi worm which attempts to cleanse computers infected by MyDoom and download Microsoft security patches to unprotected computers has careened onto the Net this morning.

Nachi-B (AKA Welchi) uses the same security vulnerability exploited by the Blaster worm to spread. Once it infects target machines the worm attempts to search and destroy any traces of MyDoom infection - before downloading patches for the Microsoft vulnerability it used to infect the system in the first place.

The worm might display a text saying "LET HISTORY TELL FUTURE !" and make references to the dropping of atomic bombs during WWII, according to a preliminary analysis by F-Secure.

The original Nachi worm, seen in August 2003, attempted to remove infections from computers infected by Blaster.

The scanning traffic generated by the original Nachi worm caused huge problems. AV vendors fear a repeat performance this time around. This concern is compounded by the plethora of new viruses released in recent days. As well as the Doomjuice worms (which target Microsoft's Web site in DDoS attacks), we have MyDoom and variants and now a Nachi variant.

As if that little lot wasn't enough, today also saw the arrival of a Trojan, called Mitglieder-H, with the ability to spread to computers infected with the MyDoom-A worm.

One small comfort is that MyDoom-A, the biggest menace, stops spreading today.

The Microsoft security patch to defend against the vulnerability exploited by the Nachi and Blaster can be found here. To scan Windows boxes for security vulnerabilities visit Windows Update here. ®

Related Stories

Blaster variant offers 'fix' for pox-ridden PCs
Nachi worm infected Diebold ATMs
Latest Email worm (MyDoom) has SCO-facing payload
MyDoom assault forces SCO.com off the net
Worms pour through MyDoom back door
MyDoom dies today


Other stories you might like

  • The ‘substantial contributions’ Intel has promised to boost RISC-V adoption
    With the benefit of maybe revitalizing the x86 giant’s foundry business

    Analysis Here's something that would have seemed outlandish only a few years ago: to help fuel Intel's future growth, the x86 giant has vowed to do what it can to make the open-source RISC-V ISA worthy of widespread adoption.

    In a presentation, an Intel representative shared some details of how the chipmaker plans to contribute to RISC-V as part of its bet that the instruction set architecture will fuel growth for its revitalized contract chip manufacturing business.

    While Intel invested in RISC-V chip designer SiFive in 2018, the semiconductor titan's intentions with RISC-V evolved last year when it revealed that the contract manufacturing business key to its comeback, Intel Foundry Services, would be willing to make chips compatible with x86, Arm, and RISC-V ISAs. The chipmaker then announced in February it joined RISC-V International, the ISA's governing body, and launched a $1 billion innovation fund that will support chip designers, including those making RISC-V components.

    Continue reading
  • FBI warns of North Korean cyberspies posing as foreign IT workers
    Looking for tech talent? Kim Jong-un's friendly freelancers, at your service

    Pay close attention to that resume before offering that work contract.

    The FBI, in a joint advisory with the US government Departments of State and Treasury, has warned that North Korea's cyberspies are posing as non-North-Korean IT workers to bag Western jobs to advance Kim Jong-un's nefarious pursuits.

    In guidance [PDF] issued this week, the Feds warned that these techies often use fake IDs and other documents to pose as non-North-Korean nationals to gain freelance employment in North America, Europe, and east Asia. Additionally, North Korean IT workers may accept foreign contracts and then outsource those projects to non-North-Korean folks.

    Continue reading
  • Elon Musk says Twitter buy 'cannot move forward' until spam stats spat settled
    A stunning surprise to no one in this Solar System

    Elon Musk said his bid to acquire and privatize Twitter "cannot move forward" until the social network proves its claim that fake bot accounts make up less than five per cent of all users.

    The world's richest meme lord formally launched efforts to take over Twitter last month after buying a 9.2 per cent stake in the biz. He declined an offer to join the board of directors, only to return asking if he could buy the social media platform outright at $54.20 per share. Twitter's board resisted Musk's plans at first, installing a "poison pill" to hamper a hostile takeover before accepting the deal, worth over $44 billion.

    But then it appears Musk spotted something in Twitter's latest filing to America's financial watchdog, the SEC. The paperwork asserted that "fewer than five percent" of Twitter's monetizable daily active users (mDAUs) in the first quarter of 2022 were fake or spammer accounts, which Musk objected to: he felt that figure should be a lot higher. He had earlier proclaimed that ridding Twitter of spam bots was a priority for him, post-takeover.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022