Forget dogging, here comes toothing

Bluetooth-driven liaisons in train toilets


Bored UK commuters are arranging impromtu rumpy-pumpy via their Bluetooth phones and PDAs.

The new craze - known as "Toothing" and certain to displace dogging as the sexual flavour of the month - began on a London commute when a flirtatious bluejacking escalated into a meeting in the railway toilets.

According to a report on Reuters the first toother was a chap called Jon, who also goes by the exceedingly clever handle "Toothy Toothing". He says that he was flirting with a fellow commuter via Bluetooth for a couple of days on his normal train journey. Eventually, she suggested nipping into the lav for a quickie, and toothing was born.

Oh, the glamour.

Bizarre as this sounds, Jon estimates that there are thousands (yes, thousands) of toothers on trains in the UK. The message boards on his site are certainly busy.

We at Vulture Central were a tad suspicious about this being the latest, greatest way for geeks to meet girls. After all, look at the profile of the classic early adopter and it is far more likely that there will be more boys with toys than girls. (Please note: we said likely, not certain. No letters, thanks.)

A quick scan of the toothing message boards finds more than one posting supporting this theory: "Looking for gay sex in Amsterdam Airport" says one. Another, calling himself "InterSlutty" (most droll) says that the London to Brighton line is best, but adds that he is "Not sure about straight toothing, though".

But this isn't just high tech cottaging: girls can play too. Jon says that part of the fun is working out whether you are flrting with a girl or a guy. "Steve", another enthusiast, says he met up with a girl through toothing. He told Reuters the hobby fills him "with a real buzz". Perhaps he has not figured out how to disable the vibrate function on his phone. Fancy getting jiggy with it with anyone on your commute? Perish the thought, but hey, it takes all sorts: Surf your way to Toothy Toothing's guide to Toothing (!) here.

There is no need to let us know how you get on. ®

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