Navman preps PocketPC with GPS

Mitac's Mio 168 finds another supporter


Reg Kit Watch GPS specialist Navman has pitched itself against the likes of German electronics company Medion and UK PC vendor Evesham by launching its own low-cost PocketPC-based personal GPS system.

And like Evesham's recently launch bundle (check out El Reg's review), the Navman PiN is based on a PDA with an integrated GPS receiver.

Navman PiNIndeed, according to sources close to the company, it's the same integrated device: Mitac's Mio 168. The PocketPC is based on a 300MHz Intel XScale PXA255 processor running Windows Mobile 2003. It contains 64MB of RAM, 32MB of ROM and boasts the usual 3.5in transflective 240 x 320 display. Expansion comes courtesy of an SD/MMC card slot.

Navman's version ships with the company's own navigation software, SmartST V2, and a Europe-wide map package. The PiN ships with street-level maps for 16 European countries: UK, Ireland, France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Austria, Switzerland, Portugal, Spain, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Sweden, all on CD-ROM and ready to be copied over to the bundled 128MB memory card - large enough for a single country.

The PiN also ships with a in-car power adaptor and a windscreen mounting kit.

SmartST V2 uses to the map data to calculate and display the routes you choose. The software can display maps in 3D mode or the more traditional map-like overhead view. Drivers can be guided by spoken directions so they never have to take their eyes off the road. SmartST can also conjure up alternative routes to bypass roadworks and traffic jams, and will quickly get motorists, cyclists and walkers back on course if they take a wrong turning.

The Navman PiN goes on sale throughout Europe in June for £449 including UK sales tax or €649. ®

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PDA makers unveil Wi-Fi, GPRS PDAs
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