London sees red as Orange service goes crash

Software update blamed


Orange has apologised to its punters in London after its service went titsup for 12 hours following a software update on its network. Orange mobile phone users in London began experiencing problems from midnight last night. The problems - which led to intermittent problems with making and receiving calls - were sorted by midday today.

Said Orange in a statement: "We can confirm that between midnight on Monday 17 May and midday on Tuesday 18 May a number of Orange customers in the London area may have experienced intermittent difficulties making or receiving calls. This was due to a software update on the Orange network. Our engineers established the cause of the fault, and normal service has now been restored."

Earlier this month Orange UK was forced to apologise to its punters travelling in Germany after the mobilephoneco was hit by technical problems. ®

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