Acer brings Bluetooth to PocketPC line

Slimline PDA


Reg Kit Watch Acer has updated its PocketPC family with a model it has already dubbed the "wireless wonder", launching the device in Taiwan today.

Acer n30 Bluetooth PocketPCThe hyperbole isn't entirely warranted, however: while the new n30 brings Bluetooth to the line-up, it's missing the Wi-Fi and GPRS connectivity you might expect such a named device to carry.

Acer currently only offers one Wi-Fi PDA, the n20w, in certain territories in the Asia-Pacific region.

The n30 is driven by a Samsung S3C2410 CPU clocked to 266MHz. It contains 64MB of SDRAM and 32MB of Flash ROM. The screen is the usual 3.5in 240 x 320 display, and the device runs the first edition of Windows Mobile 2003.

Acer's new model is a compact 11.8 x 7.1 x 1.3cm and weighs 130g, so it's both slimmer and lighter than its n10 predecessor. It provides a single SD IO/MMC slot for expansion, though the n10 offers a CompactFlash connector, one of the reasons for its bigger bulk. Inside the n30 is a 1000mAh rechargeable battery.

The n30 is expected to retail for around $280 in the US and is already available in the UK for around £180. ®

Related stories

FCC posts GSM, Wi-Fi iPaq specs
HP preps 4 July iPaq launch
Bluetooth group preps 2.1Mbps spec
'Official' Pocket Loox 700 Wi-Fi PDA pic appears on web
Dell readies 624MHz Wi-Fi PocketPC
Navman preps PocketPC with GPS
PDA makers unveil Wi-Fi, GPRS PDAs
Asus adds Wi-Fi to MyPal PDA family
Orange launches own-brand wireless PDA

Related reviews

Medion MDPPC250 PocketPC GPS Bundle
Evesham integrated GPS PocketPC
Bsquare Power Handheld

Similar topics


Other stories you might like

  • Lunar rocks brought to Earth by China's Chang'e 5 show Moon's volcanoes were recently* active

    * Just a couple of billion years

    The Moon remained volcanically active much later than previously thought, judging from fragments of rocks dating back two billion years that were collected by China's Chang’e 5 spacecraft.

    The Middle Kingdom's space agency obtained about 1.72 kilograms (3.8 pounds) of lunar material from its probe that returned to Earth from the Moon in December. These samples gave scientists their first chance to get their hands on fresh Moon material in the 40 years since the Soviet Union's Luna 24 mission brought 170 grams (six ounces) of regolith to our home world in 1976.

    The 47 shards of basalt rocks retrieved by Chang'e 5 were estimated to be around two billion years old using radiometric dating techniques. The relatively young age means that the Moon was still volcanically active up to 900 million years later than previous estimates, according to a team of researchers led by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

    Continue reading
  • Centre for Computing History apologises to customers for 'embarrassing' breach

    Website patched following phishing scam, no financial data exposed

    The Centre for Computing History (CCH) in Cambridge, England, has apologised for an "embarrassing" breach in its online customer datafile, though thankfully no payment card information was exposed.

    The museum for computers and video games said it was notified that a unique email address used to book tickets via its website "has subsequently received a phishing email that looked like it came from HSBC."

    "Our investigation has revealed that our online customer datafile has been compromised and the email addresses contained within are now in the hands of spammers," says the letter to visitors from Jason Fitzpatrick, CEO and trustee at CCH dated 19 October.

    Continue reading
  • Ancient with a dash of modern: We joined the Royal Navy to find there's little new in naval navigation

    Following the Fleet Navigating Officers' course

    Boatnotes II The art of not driving your warship into the coast or the seabed is a curious blend of the ancient and the very modern, as The Reg discovered while observing the Royal Navy's Fleet Navigating Officers' (FNO) course.

    Held aboard HMS Severn, "sea week" of the FNO course involves taking students fresh from classroom training and putting them on the bridge of a real live ship – and then watching them navigate through progressively harder real-life challenges.

    "It's about finding where the students' capacity limit is," FNO instructor Lieutenant Commander Mark Raeburn told The Register. Safety comes first: the Navy isn't interested in having navigators who can't keep up with the pressures and volume of information during pilotage close to shore – or near enemy minefields.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021