Mobile phones rot your balls

Hello Moto. Goodbye Mojo


Carrying a mobile phone can reduce a man's sperm count by as much as 30 per cent, according to Hungarian scientists. The study suggests that the radiation from a phone on a belt or in their pocket, even on standby, is enough to have an effect on both sperm count, and the mobility of surviving sperm.

The study, which looked at 221 men, compared the sperm count of men who carried a handset for most of the day with the sperm of those who did not own a phone.

Dr Imre Fejes of the University of Szeged in Hungary led the research. He reported that the average sperm counts of men who were very active phone users was around 59 million per millilitre of seminal fluid, compared with 83 million for the men without phones.

Fejes acknowledged that further studies were needed to confirm the findings, but concluded that "prolonged use of cellphones may have a negative effect on spermatogenesis and male fertility that presumably deteriorates both concentration and motility".

The results, presented at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology, Berlin, Germany, have been received cautiously by the scientific community. This is the first study to examine the impact of mobile phone radiation on fertility and specialists claim the study raises more questions than it answers.

Professor Hans Evers, a gynaecologist from the Academic Hospital in Maastricht, the Netherlands, said the research had not considered other factors, such as age and background, that would have an impact on fertility.

"It is an observational as opposed to interventional study which appears not to take into account the many potential confounding factors which could have skewed the results. For example, what if heavy mobile phone users in Hungary have particularly stressful lives and jobs?" Factors like this would have a considerable effect on the outcome of the research, he told The Independent.

The safety of mobile phone radiation is still a contentious issue. The independent Advisory Group on Non-ionising Radiation (AGNIR) issued a report in January, having reviewed the extant body of research. This concluded: "It is not possible at present to say that exposure to RF (radiofrequency) radiation, even at levels below national guidelines, is totally without potential adverse health effects, and that the gaps in knowledge are sufficient to justify a precautionary approach." ®

Mobile phones - you're all going to die

Kids, cancer and mobile phones
Mobile phones are a pain in the neck
Mobile phones safe -report
Text messaging could damage your kidneys
Mobiles more dangerous than wild elephants
My head hurts and I want $800m
Finally the truth! Mobiles only kill children

Similar topics

Broader topics


Other stories you might like

  • Stolen university credentials up for sale by Russian crooks, FBI warns
    Forget dark-web souks, thousands of these are already being traded on public bazaars

    Russian crooks are selling network credentials and virtual private network access for a "multitude" of US universities and colleges on criminal marketplaces, according to the FBI.

    According to a warning issued on Thursday, these stolen credentials sell for thousands of dollars on both dark web and public internet forums, and could lead to subsequent cyberattacks against individual employees or the schools themselves.

    "The exposure of usernames and passwords can lead to brute force credential stuffing computer network attacks, whereby attackers attempt logins across various internet sites or exploit them for subsequent cyber attacks as criminal actors take advantage of users recycling the same credentials across multiple accounts, internet sites, and services," the Feds' alert [PDF] said.

    Continue reading
  • Big Tech loves talking up privacy – while trying to kill privacy legislation
    Study claims Amazon, Apple, Google, Meta, Microsoft work to derail data rules

    Amazon, Apple, Google, Meta, and Microsoft often support privacy in public statements, but behind the scenes they've been working through some common organizations to weaken or kill privacy legislation in US states.

    That's according to a report this week from news non-profit The Markup, which said the corporations hire lobbyists from the same few groups and law firms to defang or drown state privacy bills.

    The report examined 31 states when state legislatures were considering privacy legislation and identified 445 lobbyists and lobbying firms working on behalf of Amazon, Apple, Google, Meta, and Microsoft, along with industry groups like TechNet and the State Privacy and Security Coalition.

    Continue reading
  • SEC probes Musk for not properly disclosing Twitter stake
    Meanwhile, social network's board rejects resignation of one its directors

    America's financial watchdog is investigating whether Elon Musk adequately disclosed his purchase of Twitter shares last month, just as his bid to take over the social media company hangs in the balance. 

    A letter [PDF] from the SEC addressed to the tech billionaire said he "[did] not appear" to have filed the proper form detailing his 9.2 percent stake in Twitter "required 10 days from the date of acquisition," and asked him to provide more information. Musk's shares made him one of Twitter's largest shareholders. The letter is dated April 4, and was shared this week by the regulator.

    Musk quickly moved to try and buy the whole company outright in a deal initially worth over $44 billion. Musk sold a chunk of his shares in Tesla worth $8.4 billion and bagged another $7.14 billion from investors to help finance the $21 billion he promised to put forward for the deal. The remaining $25.5 billion bill was secured via debt financing by Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, Barclays, and others. But the takeover is not going smoothly.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022