HP boots ServerWorks with new Xeon kit

64-bit ProLiant charge


HP looks set to upgrade four of its ProLiant servers with Intel's new 64-bit Xeon processor in the very near future, according to information from HP partners.

The HP ProLiant ML350, ML370, DL360 and DL380 (G4) servers should all start arriving shortly with the x86-64-bit Xeon chip code-named Nocona. HP will also upgrade its BL30p blade server with the chip. In the new kit, HP will be using chipsets from Intel as opposed to ServerWorks, which currently dominates HP's ProLiant line. HP will kick off the new ProLiant gear with 3.6GHz Xeons, according to the partner information.

Intel is currently the only vendor with a Nocona chipset prepped that we are aware of, which likely explains the absence of ServerWorks gear.

HP declined to comment officially on "unannounced products." ServerWorks declined to return our phone call. And Intel declined to rat out either its customer or partner. Luckily, we are not subject to the same code of silence these vendors' share.

Last month, Intel followed rival AMD to the x86-64bit market with the release of a new Xeon aimed at workstations. At the time, it promised to deliver a similar chip designed for two-processor servers within "60 days," and that is the part HP, along with a number of other vendors, will now pick up.

All of the HP systems listed above are dual-processor boxes with the DL servers being slimmer, lower-end kit compared to the beefier ML boxes. A sample configuration of the new DL380 G4 listed on a partner site shows the box shipping with the Intel E7520 chipset, 8GB of memory and 36GB Ultra320 SCI drives. HP will offer the DL360 server with both SCSI and SATA drives.

HP has already certified Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on the new kit.

The Xeon systems will join HP's existing x86-64-bit gear based on AMD's Opteron processor. ®

Related stories

Egenera and its amazing technicolor IPO
HP gets vague about Opteron and Itanium blades
HP maps growth path
HP takes Opteron to the next level


Other stories you might like

  • Millions of people's info stolen from MGM Resorts dumped on Telegram for free
    Meanwhile, Twitter coughs up $150m after using account security contact details for advertising

    Miscreants have dumped on Telegram more than 142 million customer records stolen from MGM Resorts, exposing names, postal and email addresses, phone numbers, and dates of birth for any would-be identity thief.

    The vpnMentor research team stumbled upon the files, which totaled 8.7 GB of data, on the messaging platform earlier this week, and noted that they "assume at least 30 million people had some of their data leaked." MGM Resorts, a hotel and casino chain, did not respond to The Register's request for comment.

    The researchers reckon this information is linked to the theft of millions of guest records, which included the details of Twitter's Jack Dorsey and pop star Justin Bieber, from MGM Resorts in 2019 that was subsequently distributed via underground forums.

    Continue reading
  • DuckDuckGo tries to explain why its browsers won't block some Microsoft web trackers
    Meanwhile, Tails 5.0 users told to stop what they're doing over Firefox flaw

    DuckDuckGo promises privacy to users of its Android, iOS browsers, and macOS browsers – yet it allows certain data to flow from third-party websites to Microsoft-owned services.

    Security researcher Zach Edwards recently conducted an audit of DuckDuckGo's mobile browsers and found that, contrary to expectations, they do not block Meta's Workplace domain, for example, from sending information to Microsoft's Bing and LinkedIn domains.

    Specifically, DuckDuckGo's software didn't stop Microsoft's trackers on the Workplace page from blabbing information about the user to Bing and LinkedIn for tailored advertising purposes. Other trackers, such as Google's, are blocked.

    Continue reading
  • Despite 'key' partnership with AWS, Meta taps up Microsoft Azure for AI work
    Someone got Zuck'd

    Meta’s AI business unit set up shop in Microsoft Azure this week and announced a strategic partnership it says will advance PyTorch development on the public cloud.

    The deal [PDF] will see Mark Zuckerberg’s umbrella company deploy machine-learning workloads on thousands of Nvidia GPUs running in Azure. While a win for Microsoft, the partnership calls in to question just how strong Meta’s commitment to Amazon Web Services (AWS) really is.

    Back in those long-gone days of December, Meta named AWS as its “key long-term strategic cloud provider." As part of that, Meta promised that if it bought any companies that used AWS, it would continue to support their use of Amazon's cloud, rather than force them off into its own private datacenters. The pact also included a vow to expand Meta’s consumption of Amazon’s cloud-based compute, storage, database, and security services.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022