Rampant capitalism upsets delicate Reg reader

Sort of. And something about dog chips...


Letters: Microsoft's Q4 earnings (a paltry $2.94bn) were not just unpopular with Wall Street. The numbers didn't go over a bundle with you lot, either. One particularly irritated chap emailed us, presumably to vent his spleen:

So WHEN, oh WHEN will we start ignoring these 'Analysts' ???? They should be second to be lined up against the wall when the revolution comes. Right After Lawyers, and just before Marketing pukes.

When the WORLDS BIGGEST MONOPOLY cannot make enough money to SATISFY these "Ar--Holes", then the "Ar--Holes" need to be scrutinized, VERY, VERY, carefully !!!!

The M$ link you provided states that quarterly revenue is up to $ 3.13 BILLION from $ 1.54 BILLION in last years Q4. Gee, THAT sounds like more than DOUBLE !!!!!

Ah, What's the use ! B.T.W.: I'm also testing who you give my email address out to !! Jim

Visually, a very impressive Flame there, Jim, and great work on the punctuation front. Content wise, it wasn't great - maybe 6/10? Mind you, the levels of insanity are not bad. Maybe a 7/10 after all.

Also, to clarify once again, for the paranoid, it is Reg policy that we will not publish email addresses of any private individuals on our site. We will also withold the name of correspondents, if it is asked of us


News this week that the government is wasting money on its IT projects may have shocked some people in Parliament, but not our loyal readers.

Hello

As an aside to your article on UK eGov being a load of b*llocks, can I just point out that I have worked on the DWP (Department of Work and Pensions) estate for EDS in Blackpool for the last year & the entire thing still runs on Windows 2000 SP2! Microsoft have insisted that EDS move it to SP4 or they are withdrawing support.

The testing team are still dragging their feet despite problems showing up every week.

I have worked on many systems for many companies & have never known a more unreliable estate than the DWP..

Name supplied


You really are a helpful lot, aren't you? A kindly soul among the Reg brethren (and sistren) thought that those visitng Vegas for DEFCON might like to know who else is in town next week:

SCOforum is scheduled for August 1 - 3, 2004. Perhaps some of the DEFCON attendees might find it interesting to drop in and see how good old SCO is doing. A. Lizard

Well, if you are in the neighbourhood, it would be rude not to say "Hi".


IBM's new supercomputer project with the US Navy has upset Army fans:

FYI, the US Navy's IBM supercomputer would not be the military's fastest computer. At 20 teraflops, it is still slower than the 25 teraflop supercomputer that Colsa (http://www.colsa.com) is building for the US Army.

To quote from information on Colsa's main page:

"Colsa is building MACH 5 for the Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center, a division of the United States Army's Research and Development Command located at Redstone Arsenal. The supercomputer is expected to be in use by the Army this fall."

Pete

Ah, the old Army vs. Navy rivalry. Some things transcend all borders.


Finally, a couple of thoughts on the whole RFID hospital tagging situation:

What was wrong with a NAME printed on a tag?

Oh well, technology for technology's sake isn't a new phenomenon. Mark


The RSPCA at the end of the road where I work also offers a pet chipping service. Whenever I see the sign (most days) I think of the film Fargo.

Ian

Ian, you are a sick, sick puppy, and we mean that in a good way. Thanks for sharing. ®


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