IBM recalls 500,000 melting notebook adapters

Fire in the hole


More than 500,000 notebook power adapters sold by IBM are being recalled to offset the threat of melting plastic and even fire.

IBM and the US Consumer Product Safety Commission announced the recall, saying at least six consumers have reported incidents with the power adapters. The adapters were produced by Delta Electronics and sit in systems shipped between January 1999 and August 2000. The main systems affected were the ThinkPad i Series notebooks and ThinkPad 390 and 240 series.

"If your AC adapter is one of those affected by this recall, IBM will replace the AC adapter, free of charge," the company said on its Web site. "IBM also requests that you do not leave your current AC adapter plugged into any AC power outlet while unattended."

There have been reports of some property damage but no reports of personal injury from the toasty adapters, IBM said. ®

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