iPod gains ghettoblaster accessory

And Dension updates its in-car iPod adaptor


North American iPod users can now blast the music collections to the whole street courtesy of accessory maker Digital Lifestyle Outfitters (DLO)'s latest add-on for the digital music device.

Actually, 'add-on' seems too small a word. The iBoom is an entire ghettoblaster with a handy slot in which to drop Apple's miniscule MP3 player.

DLO iBoom

The unit accommodates all iPods, old and new, classic and Mini, with the exception of the iPod Photo. A button flips the machine's amplifier between the integrated FM radio - with four station pre-sets - and the iPod, the latter controlled from its own clickwheel. The beefed up sound is pumped out of four speakers.

For outdoor listening, the iBoom can take six D-size batteries. Indoors, there's an AC adaptor to use, which also charges the iPod while it's in the boombox.

DLO is selling the iBoom through CompUSA stores and online via dlodirect.com. The unit retails for $150.

Separately, Hungarian in-car audio specialist Dension this week unveiled an update to its ice>Link adaptor for car stereos. ice>Link connects an iPod to headunits that support an auxiliary input for CD changers. The upshot: you can use your motor's cassette or CD player to control the iPod and play the songs it holds.

The newly announced ice>Link Plus builds on the current version by utilising the iPod's screen as a secondary display device, and even patches iPod clickwheel and button presses back onto the host car audio system.

The new version can also use the iPod itself as a firmware update source, grabbing updates copied first from a PC or Mac to the iPod. Dension has also introduced a line of mounting units for third- and fourth-generation iPods and iPod Minis, which hook up via the dock connector. A plug-in combo Firewire/remote control/earphone unit is available for first- and second-generation iPods.

ice>Link Plus supports a wide-range of factor-installed headunits and aftermarket versions. It is set to ship next month for £99/$199/€149. You can fit it yourself if you have some experience of in-car audio, or Denison's website lists professional installers with ice>Link expertise. ®

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