HP laughs off Tru64 promises, welcomes Veritas

Roadmap reversal


HP has given up on trying to bring key parts of Compaq/DEC's Tru64 operating system over to HP-UX and decided instead to buy similar technology from Veritas.

In a move that is simultaneously bizarre and predictable, HP has reneged on its promise to port the TruCluster and Advanced File System technology from Tru64 to HP-UX. HP will now only offer its customers the Veritas Storage Foundation Cluster File System and Storage Foundation for Oracle RAC products to those who which to create groups of servers that are loosely linked together.

HP already has a partnership with Veritas around its Volume Manager product. Now it's looking for Veritas to take care of it on the cluster file system side of the house as well, and the two companies today announced a multi-year agreement to that effect. Veritas has traditionally made loads of money selling its file system and volume manager products to Sun Microsystems' Solaris customers.

"Our collaboration with Veritas helps us to deliver on our Adaptive Enterprise strategy and assists our UNIX customers in their evolution to next-generation platforms," said Rich Marcello, a SVP in HP's server unit. "The thousands of customers running HP Serviceguard on HP-UX 11i today will gain access to Veritas software -- directly from HP -- and close integration, a simplified purchasing process and cooperative support."

HP is spinning this announcement as great news for its customers. This is mostly because HP will offer the Veritas code as part of HP-UX 11i V2 by the third quarter of next year. HP had not planned to complete similar work with the Tru64 code until 2006 when HP-UX 11i V3 arrived, giving customers close to a year edge if they pick up the Veritas technology.

The move, however, is bizarre in that HP has already spent years and tons of money trying to port the Tru64 technology to HP-UX. HP had once planned for the Tru64 goodies to arrive this year and made a big deal of this quick turnaround when it first acquired Compaq. HP later pushed back the delivery date for the clustering products to 2006 and the delivery of the advanced file system product to the second half of 2005.

"The schedule for TruCluster and AdvFS at the close of the merger targeted delivery by the end of 2004," HP told The Register. "As the technical teams became one and developed a bottoms up schedule it became apparent that more time would be required.

"Customers have provided input that HP needed to improve time to market. Since the initial roadmap was laid out in 2002, virtualization has gained market momentum, and HP has secured a leadership position in this space. As Veritas continued to develop and enhance both their file system and CFS capabilities, it gave HP an opportunity to both improve time to market of important capabilities and align our clustering and virtualization roadmaps."

But was it customer demand or just plain, old predicable cost cuts that drove HP's decision to go with Veritas? HP has spent most of its post-acquisition days cutting costs wherever possible out of its server business. The company seemed to have lost the talent and resolve to get the Tru64 to HP-UX work done. The engineers working on this project are, no doubt, members of the most recent server division cuts. HP continues to gut its server research and development ranks at an astonishing rate. In addition, it has totally misled the Compaq customers.

Ironically, HP also announced today that it is expanding its Alpha RetainTrust program for Tru64 UNIX customers. HP will now teach its customers how best to roll out the Veritas software. A wonderful gesture.

For Veritas, this has to be seen as a pretty solid win. The company has been paying more attention to HP-UX for the past year or so, and this should open up an even larger market for the company's products.

How does all this make you Tru64 users feel? Let us know. ®

Related stories

Interex cowers behind HP omerta
HP users decry Itanium, SAP issues and bad English
HP's Unix base offered Opteron carrot
HP unveils Unix roadmaps
Fiorina touts HP advances


Other stories you might like

  • Verizon: Ransomware sees biggest jump in five years
    We're only here for DBIRs

    The cybersecurity landscape continues to expand and evolve rapidly, fueled in large part by the cat-and-mouse game between miscreants trying to get into corporate IT environments and those hired by enterprises and security vendors to keep them out.

    Despite all that, Verizon's annual security breach report is again showing that there are constants in the field, including that ransomware continues to be a fast-growing threat and that the "human element" still plays a central role in most security breaches, whether it's through social engineering, bad decisions, or similar.

    According to the US carrier's 2022 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) released this week [PDF], ransomware accounted for 25 percent of the observed security incidents that occurred between November 1, 2020, and October 31, 2021, and was present in 70 percent of all malware infections. Ransomware outbreaks increased 13 percent year-over-year, a larger increase than the previous five years combined.

    Continue reading
  • Slack-for-engineers Mattermost on open source and data sovereignty
    Control and access are becoming a hot button for orgs

    Interview "It's our data, it's our intellectual property. Being able to migrate it out those systems is near impossible... It was a real frustration for us."

    These were the words of communication and collaboration platform Mattermost's founder and CTO, Corey Hulen, speaking to The Register about open source, sovereignty and audio bridges.

    "Some of the history of Mattermost is exactly that problem," says Hulen of the issue of closed source software. "We were using proprietary tools – we were not a collaboration platform before, we were a games company before – [and] we were extremely frustrated because we couldn't get our intellectual property out of those systems..."

    Continue reading
  • UK government having hard time complying with its own IR35 tax rules
    This shouldn't come as much of a surprise if you've been reading the headlines at all

    Government departments are guilty of high levels of non-compliance with the UK's off-payroll tax regime, according to a report by MPs.

    Difficulties meeting the IR35 rules, which apply to many IT contractors, in central government reflect poor implementation by Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs (HMRC) and other government bodies, the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) said.

    "Central government is spending hundreds of millions of pounds to cover tax owed for individuals wrongly assessed as self-employed. Government departments and agencies owed, or expected to owe, HMRC £263 million in 2020–21 due to incorrect administration of the rules," the report said.

    Continue reading
  • Internet went offline in Pakistan as protestors marched for ousted prime minister
    Two hour outage 'consistent with an intentional disruption to service' said NetBlocks

    Internet interruption-watcher NetBlocks has reported internet outages across Pakistan on Wednesday, perhaps timed to coincide with large public protests over the ousting of Prime Minister Imran Khan.

    The watchdog organisation asserted that outages started after 5:00PM and lasted for about two hours. NetBlocks referred to them as “consistent with an intentional disruption to service.”

    Continue reading
  • Suspected phishing email crime boss cuffed in Nigeria
    Interpol, cops swoop with intel from cybersecurity bods

    Interpol and cops in Africa have arrested a Nigerian man suspected of running a multi-continent cybercrime ring that specialized in phishing emails targeting businesses.

    His alleged operation was responsible for so-called business email compromise (BEC), a mix of fraud and social engineering in which staff at targeted companies are hoodwinked into, for example, wiring funds to scammers or sending out sensitive information. This can be done by sending messages that impersonate executives or suppliers, with instructions on where to send payments or data, sometimes by breaking into an employee's work email account to do so.

    The 37-year-old's detention is part of a year-long, counter-BEC initiative code-named Operation Delilah that involved international law enforcement, and started with intelligence from cybersecurity companies Group-IB, Palo Alto Networks Unit 42, and Trend Micro.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022