ICANN works Harry Potter magic on net

Intriguing attendees list


Internet overseeing organisation ICANN has a difficult task ahead persuading people to let it run the whole network when its contract ends in 2006. And it is willing to try anything to get there - including, it would seem, magic.

CEO Paul Twomey gave a brief rundown on what meetings were taking place at its four-day conference in Cape Town, South Africa, as we speak. But he remained strangely tight-lipped over what some groups would be discussing in the African sun.

Is the reason anything to do with the odd appearance of one Hermione Granger representing Hogwarts, who is listed as the first attendee to the conference on ICANN's website? Has the organisation spend some of its new bigger budget on hiring Harry Potter's female companion to train staff up on magical powers? Or even to teach them the Dark Forces against the evil Voldemort aka Yoshio Utsumi, secretary-general of the ITU?

"These rumours are mere fabrication," an ICANN spokesman confirmed. "Ms Granger is here in a personal capacity and will not be teaching or taking any classes."

So just who is Ms Granger there to see? Well, amazingly, a webcast of one meeting revealed all. Making a serious point about the consensus approach that ICANN takes oh so seriously, CEO Paul Twomey momentarily put his hand to his forehead and onlookers were stunned to see a lightning-shaped scar.

Paul Twomey is Harry Potter Seasoned ICANN watcher Michael Koomfrin was not shaken by the revelation that Twomey was in fact Harry Potter however. "It's the only logical explanation," he explained. "How else could ICANN have survived until now?"

Matters were further clarified when ICANN VP Paul Verhoef - who has been travelling in Europe investigating new spells - pulled off a wig to reveal a shock of red hair and confirmed he was the real Ron Weasley.

ICANN has refused to comment on rumours that chairman Vint Cerf was actually Draco Malfoy. ®

Related stories

ICANN pitches the internet's future
Happy birthday, the internet
VeriSign antitrust claim against ICANN rebuffed


Other stories you might like

  • GPL legal battle: Vizio told by judge it will have to answer breach-of-contract claims
    Fine-print crucially deemed contractual agreement as well as copyright license in smartTV source-code case

    The Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) has won a significant legal victory in its ongoing effort to force Vizio to publish the source code of its SmartCast TV software, which is said to contain GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1 copyleft-licensed components.

    SFC sued Vizio, claiming it was in breach of contract by failing to obey the terms of the GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1 licenses that require source code to be made public when certain conditions are met, and sought declaratory relief on behalf of Vizio TV owners. SFC wanted its breach-of-contract arguments to be heard by the Orange County Superior Court in California, though Vizio kicked the matter up to the district court level in central California where it hoped to avoid the contract issue and defend its corner using just federal copyright law.

    On Friday, Federal District Judge Josephine Staton sided with SFC and granted its motion to send its lawsuit back to superior court. To do so, Judge Staton had to decide whether or not the federal Copyright Act preempted the SFC's breach-of-contract allegations; in the end, she decided it didn't.

    Continue reading
  • US brings first-of-its-kind criminal charges of Bitcoin-based sanctions-busting
    Citizen allegedly moved $10m-plus in BTC into banned nation

    US prosecutors have accused an American citizen of illegally funneling more than $10 million in Bitcoin into an economically sanctioned country.

    It's said the resulting criminal charges of sanctions busting through the use of cryptocurrency are the first of their kind to be brought in the US.

    Under the United States' International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEA), it is illegal for a citizen or institution within the US to transfer funds, directly or indirectly, to a sanctioned country, such as Iran, Cuba, North Korea, or Russia. If there is evidence the IEEA was willfully violated, a criminal case should follow. If an individual or financial exchange was unwittingly involved in evading sanctions, they may be subject to civil action. 

    Continue reading
  • Meta hires network chip guru from Intel: What does this mean for future silicon?
    Why be a customer when you can develop your own custom semiconductors

    Analysis Here's something that should raise eyebrows in the datacenter world: Facebook parent company Meta has hired a veteran networking chip engineer from Intel to lead silicon design efforts in the internet giant's infrastructure hardware engineering group.

    Jon Dama started as director of silicon in May for Meta's infrastructure hardware group, a role that has him "responsible for several design teams innovating the datacenter for scale," according to his LinkedIn profile. In a blurb, Dama indicated that a team is already in place at Meta, and he hopes to "scale the next several doublings of data processing" with them.

    Though we couldn't confirm it, we think it's likely that Dama is reporting to Alexis Bjorlin, Meta's vice president of infrastructure hardware who previously worked with Dama when she was general manager of Intel's Connectivity group before serving a two-year stint at Broadcom.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022