EMC aims 'switcher' campaign at Veritas users

Dantz in its pants


The moment EMC bought Dantz, you knew it was coming - a big time marketing attack against Veritas.

EMC will officially let the hounds loose tomorrow when it announces something called the "Safe Switch" program. Marketing materials being distributed to the press show that this program will center on convincing customers to shift from their Vertias data backup products to rival software from EMC. The storage giant is looking to play on potential fears Veritas customers may have about the Symantec merger and is planning to tout upcoming releases of both Legato and Dantz products.

While EMC plans to "unveil" Safe Switch tomorrow, its executives actually started talking up the program earlier this month. David DeWalt, an EVP in EMC's software group, gave CRN a sneak peek at what's coming.

"The idea is to create a complete, programmatic way of giving our customers and our competitive customers ways to switch to EMC products," he told the magazine. We want to make that total cost of ownership easy for them to move.

"Specifically, we are going after (Veritas) Net BackUp in the data center with NetWorker, with disk-to-disk types of solutions. We have a lot of ways we can usurp Veritas' position in the data center."

EMC intends to offer support services as part of Safe Switch to customers moving to Oracle's 10g database. The idea being that customers upgrading their database might also be in the market for a new backup product. EMC, however, will have to be very convincing to shift customers from the popular Net Backup software to the NetWorker code acquired in its buy of Legato.

But this high-end competition between EMC and Veritas isn't terribly new.

What is new is that the Safe Switch campaign will see EMC using its Dantz software to really attack Veritas further down the food chain for the first time. EMC will provide the same type of support services to customers picking up new versions of Microsoft Exchange. It hopes to use the Dantz code to push Veritas' Backup Exec out of the way.

This will likely be EMC's hardest sell of all given Backup Exec's dominant position in the Windows backup market. EMC might win over the miniscule Mac customer base with Dantz product, but Dantz is hardly the fist name that comes to mind for Windows Server backup customers.

In addition, Veritas last week released its best version of Backup Exec to date. Whatever upgrade EMC has planned with the Dantz code will have to be very impressive.

EMC stated that it managed to steal 100 Veritas customers during the second half of 2004 and expects the Safe Switch campaign to continue this trend.

EMC has enjoyed a banner year with the software side of the house kicking into overdrive. Such success no doubt caught the eye of executives at Veritas, and they're sure to take the EMC backup threat seriously.

Still, it will take far more than a marketing move to unseat Veritas from its position as backup king. Customers interviewed recently by The Register don't seem terribly concerned about the upcoming Symantec integration and are pleased with the direction Veritas has taken in the backup arena. And, despite its ties to tape, Veritas is placing just as much emphasis as EMC on disk-based backup these days. It remains to be seen whether the Safe Switch program is light and fluffy or chock full of real benefits to customers. Either way, both EMC and Veritas clients are sure to benefit in the long run from a heated backup battle between the vendors. Let the games begin! ®

Related stories

2005: huge turbulence in IT market
Can the new Symantec make merging look easy?
Oracle gets really, really virtual with VMware
Customers pay billions for storage software in Q3


Other stories you might like

  • Experts: AI should be recognized as inventors in patent law
    Plus: Police release deepfake of murdered teen in cold case, and more

    In-brief Governments around the world should pass intellectual property laws that grant rights to AI systems, two academics at the University of New South Wales in Australia argued.

    Alexandra George, and Toby Walsh, professors of law and AI, respectively, believe failing to recognize machines as inventors could have long-lasting impacts on economies and societies. 

    "If courts and governments decide that AI-made inventions cannot be patented, the implications could be huge," they wrote in a comment article published in Nature. "Funders and businesses would be less incentivized to pursue useful research using AI inventors when a return on their investment could be limited. Society could miss out on the development of worthwhile and life-saving inventions."

    Continue reading
  • Declassified and released: More secret files on US govt's emergency doomsday powers
    Nuke incoming? Quick break out the plans for rationing, censorship, property seizures, and more

    More papers describing the orders and messages the US President can issue in the event of apocalyptic crises, such as a devastating nuclear attack, have been declassified and released for all to see.

    These government files are part of a larger collection of records that discuss the nature, reach, and use of secret Presidential Emergency Action Documents: these are executive orders, announcements, and statements to Congress that are all ready to sign and send out as soon as a doomsday scenario occurs. PEADs are supposed to give America's commander-in-chief immediate extraordinary powers to overcome extraordinary events.

    PEADs have never been declassified or revealed before. They remain hush-hush, and their exact details are not publicly known.

    Continue reading
  • Stolen university credentials up for sale by Russian crooks, FBI warns
    Forget dark-web souks, thousands of these are already being traded on public bazaars

    Russian crooks are selling network credentials and virtual private network access for a "multitude" of US universities and colleges on criminal marketplaces, according to the FBI.

    According to a warning issued on Thursday, these stolen credentials sell for thousands of dollars on both dark web and public internet forums, and could lead to subsequent cyberattacks against individual employees or the schools themselves.

    "The exposure of usernames and passwords can lead to brute force credential stuffing computer network attacks, whereby attackers attempt logins across various internet sites or exploit them for subsequent cyber attacks as criminal actors take advantage of users recycling the same credentials across multiple accounts, internet sites, and services," the Feds' alert [PDF] said.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022