Intel dual-core Yonah to ship single core too

Celeron M line not going dual?


Roadmap Intel's 'Yonah' dual-core mobile processor, its first 65nm Pentium M, will support a 667MHz frontside bus clock when the part ships in volume in Q1 2006, the chip maker's latest roadmaps reveal.

Yonah's launch window has been public knowledge for some time - Intel itself has said that its first 65nm processors will arrive in limited volumes late Q4 2005.

The chip's appearance on the roadmap, as noted by a variety of websites, shows it shipping at four clock speeds, though the exact frequencies are not given. The model numbers are shown: x20, x30, x40 and x50, with the x likely replaced by an integer, probably an 8 since Intel is using this for its desktop dualies in the summer.

It will be accompanied in Q1 2006 by the x38 and x48 low-voltage Yonahs, which again appear without a clock frequency indicator. By then, the Pentium LV line will have been upgraded with a 1.6GHz version, the 778, in Q3 2005.

Ultra-low voltage Yonahs won't appear until Q2 2006, the same time as the debut of a single-core Yonah aimed at the Celeron M space, and the successor to the Q1 2006-launched 1.7GHz Celeron M 390, based on Dothan. The 1.6GHz Celeron M 380 is set to ship in Q3 this year.

So is the 2.26GHz Pentium M 780, follow-up to the 2.13GHz 770 launch earlier this month to accompany Sonoma, the upgraded Centrino platform.

Yonah will have 2MB of L2 cache on the die, shared by the two Dothan Pentium M cores on board, so it's no surprise that the single-core version of Yonah has just 1MB of L2 cache. A ULV part will ship in Q2 2006 to succeed the upcoming 1GHz Celeron M 383 ULV and Q4's 1.1GHz Celeron M 393 ULV. ®

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