Intel dual-core Yonah to ship single core too

Celeron M line not going dual?


Roadmap Intel's 'Yonah' dual-core mobile processor, its first 65nm Pentium M, will support a 667MHz frontside bus clock when the part ships in volume in Q1 2006, the chip maker's latest roadmaps reveal.

Yonah's launch window has been public knowledge for some time - Intel itself has said that its first 65nm processors will arrive in limited volumes late Q4 2005.

The chip's appearance on the roadmap, as noted by a variety of websites, shows it shipping at four clock speeds, though the exact frequencies are not given. The model numbers are shown: x20, x30, x40 and x50, with the x likely replaced by an integer, probably an 8 since Intel is using this for its desktop dualies in the summer.

It will be accompanied in Q1 2006 by the x38 and x48 low-voltage Yonahs, which again appear without a clock frequency indicator. By then, the Pentium LV line will have been upgraded with a 1.6GHz version, the 778, in Q3 2005.

Ultra-low voltage Yonahs won't appear until Q2 2006, the same time as the debut of a single-core Yonah aimed at the Celeron M space, and the successor to the Q1 2006-launched 1.7GHz Celeron M 390, based on Dothan. The 1.6GHz Celeron M 380 is set to ship in Q3 this year.

So is the 2.26GHz Pentium M 780, follow-up to the 2.13GHz 770 launch earlier this month to accompany Sonoma, the upgraded Centrino platform.

Yonah will have 2MB of L2 cache on the die, shared by the two Dothan Pentium M cores on board, so it's no surprise that the single-core version of Yonah has just 1MB of L2 cache. A ULV part will ship in Q2 2006 to succeed the upcoming 1GHz Celeron M 383 ULV and Q4's 1.1GHz Celeron M 393 ULV. ®

Related stories

Roadmap: Intel to bring 64-bit to P4, Celerons in Q2
AMD's 2006 roadmap - details emerge
Intel 'Smithfield' dual-core to debut as 8xx series
Intel's 65nm desktop CPU to ship Q1 2006
Intel speeds 'multiple OS' desktop CPU schedule
AMD market share hits two-year peak
World chip sales down in December
Intel, Nvidia were Q4's graphics chip winners
Intel baffles with latest trademarks
Intel gets it right for once
Intel 64-bit Pentium 4s make retail debut


Other stories you might like

  • Ex-Qualcomm Snapdragon chief turns CEO at AI chip startup MemryX

    Meet the new boss

    A former executive leading Qualcomm's Snapdragon computing platforms has darted the company to become CEO at an AI chip startup.

    Keith Kressin will lead product commercialization for MemryX, which was founded in 2019 and makes memory-intensive AI chiplets.

    The company is now out of stealth mode and will soon commercially ship its AI chips to non-tech customers. The company was testing early generations of its chips with industries including auto and robotics.

    Continue reading
  • Aircraft can't land safely due to interference with upcoming 5G C-band broadband service

    Expect flight delays and diversions, US Federal Aviation Administation warns

    The new 5G C-band wireless broadband service expected to rollout on 5 January 2022 in the US will disrupt local radio signals and make it difficult for airplanes to land safely in harsh weather conditions, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

    Pilots rely on radio altimeter readings to figure out when and where an aircraft should carry out a series of operations to prepare for touchdown. But the upcoming 5G C-band service beaming from cell towers threatens to interfere with these signals, the FAA warned in two reports.

    Flights may have to be delayed or restricted at certain airports as the new broadband service comes into effect next year. The change could affect some 6,834 airplanes and 1,828 helicopters. The cost to operators is expected to be $580,890.

    Continue reading
  • Canadian charged with running ransomware attack on US state of Alaska

    Cross-border op nabbed our man, boast cops and prosecutors

    A Canadian man is accused of masterminding ransomware attacks that caused "damage" to systems belonging to the US state of Alaska.

    A federal indictment against Matthew Philbert, 31, of Ottawa, was unsealed yesterday, and he was also concurrently charged by the Canadian authorities with a number of other criminal offences at the same time. US prosecutors [PDF] claimed he carried out "cyber related offences" – including a specific 2018 attack on a computer in Alaska.

    The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reported that Philbert was charged after a 23 month investigation "that also involved the [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, federal enforcers], the FBI and Europol."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021