Warning! Black Helicopters

You heard the conspiracy theory, now wear the t-shirt


Cash'n'Carrion We at Vulture Central are well aware that skies world-wide are increasingly darkening with black helicopters as conspiracy theorists fall over each other to warn humanity as to multiple threats to peoples' lives and liberty. Make no mistake: they're coming to get you and it's only a matter of time before you are enslaved to the Lizard Army's will.

Accordingly, we have decided to deploy the ultimate in awareness-raising apparel: the Warning! Black Helicopters t-shirt - hot off the presses at our secret Montana underground facility:

Warning! Black Helicopters

The design is, as ever, printed on a crisp 100 per cent cotton shirt and features a two-colour sign nicely offset by the Reg url on the left sleeve. It's available in sizes ranging from small to XXL and goes out for a mankind-preserving £12.76 (£14.99 inc VAT). It's available right now while stocks last, or until the black helicopters arrive - whichever comes soonest. Click here to fight the forces of darkness. ®

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