Phobile retro mobile phone headset

Those were the days...


Review Following on from the huge success and notoriety of the Pokia handsets, online store Firebox.com has jumped on the bandwagon and released a cheaper version it calls the Phobile, writes Stuart Miles.

Phobile headsetspacerUnlike its Pokia siblings which are custom made from original handsets and then sold for vast amounts of money on eBay, the Phobile is a mass-produced and therefore considerably cheaper handset.

spacerThe premise is simple. Create an exact replica of a Western Electric 500-series model phone handset from the 1940, afix a curly cable, bung on a mobile phone connection and you've got the latest retro headset - well handset to be more precise.

spacerThe handset is standard and you plug on different adaptors depending on your phone. Most Nokia, Siemens, Sony Ericsson and Motorola models are supported.

The handset, just like the original, is basic and the main annoyance we have is that the makers haven't even added an answer or hang-up button. Not a problem if you're a candy bar phone user, but a pain if you've got to open up your clamshell just to answer the call. Perhaps it was cost, but it wouldn't have been hard to add a button on the accompanying cable rather than the handset.

Build quality, however, along with the speaker and earpiece is superb, with the people we talked to saying they could hear us loud and clear. We had no reception problems either.

Verdict

Okay, as the press release we got in the post with the handset says, this is like attaching a typewriter to your computer. It's obvious that the Phobile is just giggles, but then this is gadgetry at its finest - pointless but funny. Combine this with the amount of comments we got when using it - not all good we have to be fair - certainly made us the talk of the office. If you've got £35 to spare and looking for a five minute wonder then this fits the bill nicely but doesn't break the bank.

We love it.

Review by
Pocket-Lint.co.uk

Phobile
 
Rating 80%
 
Pros Retro design; sturdy build; good sound.
 
Cons No answer or hang-up buttons.
 
Price £35
 
More info The Phobile site

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