UK music biz sues five 'illegal file-sharers'

P2Pers who refused to cough up a settlement


UK music trade organisation the BPI yesterday filed lawsuits against five alleged file-sharers, the first of their kind in this country.

The BPI alleges the five separately offered a total of 8,906 songs available around the world via P2P networks. None of the five - three men and two women - had permission to do so, the organisation claims.

The defendants are among dozens of alleged file-sharers who the organisation has pursued this year. Since April, 60 individuals have entered into out-of-court settlements with the BPI, paying up to £6,500 in compensation. However, the five people served with lawsuits refused to settle, the BPI said.

"We will be seeking an injunction and full damages for the losses they have caused, in addition to the considerable legal costs we are incurring as a result of their illegal activity," said BPI General Counsel Geoff Taylor in a statement.

The five individuals were not named, but the BPI said they live in King's Lynn, Crawley, Port Talbot, Brighton and South Glamorgan. Their identities were obtained by the BPI after the UK court on 11 March ordered ISPs to provide the names of account holders accused of illegal file-sharing. ®

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