Dell's Anti-Solaris site no longer on Solaris

Round Rock fires Sun, hires self for ad campaign


Dell's direct model has paid big dividends once again as the company decided to host an anti-Sun Microsystems campaign directly on its own servers instead of Sun systems. It's either crow or dog food, but something unwholesome is being eaten this week in Round Rock.

Last week, we reported on Dell's quite well-done web advertisements that attack "the leviathans of Big Iron". The cartoons give a playful edge to Dell's ongoing battle against Unix sellers Sun, IBM and HP. A problem, however, cropped up when one of Dell's partners picked Sun servers to host the commercials.

The ever-helpful Netcraft revealed that the cartoons done by Maverick Productions were being hosted on Solaris 9 servers. Since our story ran detailing this information, Dell has set up a redirect to shift surfers from www.delltechforce.com to this site hosted on Dell's own domain.

As we understand it, Dell would have moved the site sooner but was put on hold for five days as a technician in Bangalore tried to contact the ISP.®


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