Sun's 128-bit ZFS file system to ship this month

The Zettabyte wait is over


More than a year ago, Sun unleashed the idea of the Zettabyte File System (ZFS), and customers paid attention. A high-performance 128-bit file system that prevents data corruption and stretches across tons of systems? Sure. Why not.

Customers, however, have become concerned in recent months that ZFS was no more. Sun officials said relatively little about the product, and it didn't appear in Solaris 10 updates. So, a number of you wrote to us asking for an update on the software. Here it is.

Our phone taps at Sun have turned up some key ZFS information. First off, the software made it into the next version of Solaris's code base just this week. ZFS will stand as another feature in Solaris 11 or whatever Sun plans to call the next major version of its operating system.

In the meantime, customers will be able to grab ZFS from the Solaris Express program in two weeks time. It's reasonably safe to assume that an OpenSolaris launch will follow.

So what does ZFS do?

Well, the software has been in development since July of 2001 and fits broadly into the virtualization technology category. Administrators can use ZFS to spread a common file system across numerous storage boxes, getting rid of volume and partitioning management and ending the need to grow and shrink individual file systems for certain applications. ZFS also has sophisticated checks for preventing data corruption, ways to improve I/O performance and of course 128-bit support. More technical information is available here.

A number of storage companies, both large and small, have extensive file system work going on in the efforts to deliver a "pool" of boxes to customers. Many, in fact, already claim to have solved this problem, as you can see here.

Just how well ZFS stacks up against these other products remains to be seen.

In its favor, however, is Sun's growing storage business. In the past, the company has struggled to find much interest for its storage gear. But, following the StorageTek acquisition, Sun now has one of the larger tape and disk businesses. This should let Sun make the ZFS pitch to plenty of large customers.

There's more information from Mr. ZFS available here


Other stories you might like

  • Toyota, Subaru recall EVs because tires might literally fall off
    Toyota says 'all of the hub bolts' can loosen even 'after low-mileage use'

    Toyota and Subaru are recalling several thousand electric vehicles that might spontaneously shed tires due to self-loosening hub bolts. 

    Toyota issued the recall last week for 2023 bZ4X all-electric SUVs, 2,700 of which are affected, the automaker said. Subaru is recalling all-electric Solterras, which were developed jointly with Toyota and have the same issue, Reuters reported.

    Japan's auto safety regulating body said "sharp turns and sudden braking could cause a hub bolt to loosen," Reuters said, though it's unknown if any actual accidents have been caused by the defect. In its recall notice, Toyota said "all of the hub bolts" can loosen "after low-mileage use," but said it was still investigating the cause of, and driving conditions that can lead to, the issue. 

    Continue reading
  • Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise adds Wi-Fi 6E to 'premium' access points
    Company claims standard will improve performance in dense environments

    Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise is the latest networking outfit to add Wi-Fi 6E capability to its hardware, opening up access to the less congested 6GHz spectrum for business users.

    The France-based company just revealed the OmniAccess Stellar 14xx series of wireless access points, which are set for availability from this September. Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise said its first Wi-Fi 6E device will be a high-end "premium" Access Point and will be followed by a mid-range product by the end of the year.

    Wi-Fi 6E is compatible with the Wi-Fi 6 standard, but adds the ability to use channels in the 6GHz portion of the spectrum, a feature that will be built into the upcoming Wi-Fi 7 standard from the start. This enables users to reduce network contention, or so the argument goes, as the 6GHz portion of the spectrum is less congested with other traffic than the existing 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequencies used for Wi-Fi access.

    Continue reading
  • Will Lenovo ever think beyond hardware?
    Then again, why develop your own software à la HPE GreenLake when you can use someone else's?

    Analysis Lenovo fancies its TruScale anything-as-a-service (XaaS) platform as a more flexible competitor to HPE GreenLake or Dell Apex. Unlike its rivals, Lenovo doesn't believe it needs to mimic all aspects of the cloud to be successful.

    While subscription services are nothing new for Lenovo, the company only recently consolidated its offerings into a unified XaaS service called TruScale.

    On the surface TruScale ticks most of the XaaS boxes — cloud-like consumption model, subscription pricing — and it works just like you'd expect. Sign up for a certain amount of compute capacity and a short time later a rack full of pre-plumbed compute, storage, and network boxes are delivered to your place of choosing, whether that's a private datacenter, colo, or edge location.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022