Visto sues Microsoft for sync patent infringement

Fit to Burst?


Hours after striking a licensing deal with RIM's tormentor, NTP, mobile email provider Visto is suing Microsoft for patent infringement.

"Microsoft has a long and well-documented history of acquiring the technology of others, branding it as their own, and entering new markets," said CEO Brian Bogosian in a statement.

"For their foray into mobile email and data access, Microsoft simply decided to misappropriate Visto's well known and documented patented technology."

Visto alleges that Microsoft infringed on three patents, No.6.085,192, No. 6,708,222 and 6,151,606, relating to the synchronization and access of data over a network. The US Patent and Trademarks Office threw out ten of the 25 claims in the first, patent '192 in March, after re-examining the patent.

Visto will hold a press conference later today. The Silicon Valley based company is locked in ligitation with arch rival Seven, and added to its stack of suits by suing Seven subsidiary Smartner for infringing five patents back in March. ®


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