Oz flying car launch site: exclusive pictures

Google Earth mystery deepens


Your letters yesterday regarding the mysterious Perth flying car threw up quite a list of possible explanations for exactly what this object might be:

Australian flying car project revealed

The list included:

  • A hoax
  • Two cars parked next to each other
  • Hole in the ground
  • Trailer
  • Bus shelter
  • Water tower
  • Tent
  • Car on a pole
  • Harry Potter on holiday

Well, we can discount a lot of those right now, because we have secured the first on-the-spot photographic evidence of the area in question, courtesy of flag-waving Aussie Mark Zed:


Listening to Poms talk about Australia (and Perth in patricular) is pretty much like listening to American presidents talk about history... anyway... from the man on the spot who was f:8 and there.

As you can see from this overview...

Honour Avenue, Point Walter, Perth

...we have Point Walter in the background to the left, Honour Avenue down the center diagonal and the two carparks appearing in the upper half of the picture. Most importantly we have the point of specific interest to our immediate left.

What we can see from exibit A and B...

Exhibit A

Exhibit B

...(markings indicate the point of interest), is that there is a complete lack of any sort of structure viz bus shelter (there is no bus route along this road anyway), nor a gazebo nor rotunda nor information booth etc etc.

Regarding exhibit C...

Exhibit C

...also here note the lack any evidence of excavations beyond natural rain-water run off... given the steep escarpment (down into water) to the right, no work of any substantial degree could occur without significant re-enforcement or collapse of the escarpment also as there are no buildings to service there are no utilities running down this side of the road.

Which brings us to exhibit D:

Exhibit D

Anyone who may have visited this area in the past may remember information booths dotted along the way giving summarised accounts of pre & post settlement history, note however that the last of these is in fact at least 400 meters away to the south.

Therefore with overwhelming weight of logical argument, accompanied with photographic and empirical evidence one can only conclude that we West Australians have accidentally let slip that we antipodeans have secretly been leading the Jetsons lifestyle. ...

Or I could explain the simple concept of a shade tent but that may be a bit much to a nation of people who's summer lasts but half a day ;)


Right. To summarise: no buildings or permanent sturctures of any kind. Our investigator favours the shade tent explanation (for all you Poms, a shade tent is a sort of a canvas awning type structure which you can use when its not raining, so bugger all use over here), although the two parked cars theory still holds water.

As we go to press, various other Lucky Country readers are applying themselves to solving this mystery. We gather that at least one member of the Perth police department is also looking into the matter.

In the meantime, we are able to reveal that we last night received some intelligence which may enable us to correctly identify the object in question. Our operatives are right now working on obtaining corroborating evidence. Watch this space. ®


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