Star Wars TV series in 3D

Time to get your glasses on


Geek TV Certified gadget obsessives Tech Digest and Shiny Shiny scour Gizmoville for the oddest digital goodies, TV Scoop features all that's cool in British telly and Propellerhead answers your PC queries

Off the telly and on the web

I'll overlook the small issue of there not being enough HD-ready tellies to go round for the World Cup, and move swiftly on to the real story of the moment: Star Wars: the TV show.

The latest word from George Lucas is that the series, which is set to run for 100 episodes (not so much run, then, as hurl itself into the air like the Evel Knievel of shark-jumping), will screen in 3D. "Do you mean in the old-fashioned 3D?" asked a Time magazine interviewer, clearly frightened. "Yeah, with glasses and everything," replied Lucas.

3D TV? Did Lucas mis-hear his assistant when she mentioned HDTV? Money can't buy you perfect ears, George.

But it increasingly looks as though the future of TV isn't even HD - it's PC. With a Google survey finding that the net has overtaken the box as the nation's favourite time-filler (164 minutes a day vs 148 minutes), our big TV channels are falling over themselves to get their shows online. So you've got each full episode of The Apprentice on demand for a week after it's screened; clips from all six episodes of The IT Crowd to keep you happy until series two appears, and a wealth of sci-fi, including Doctor Who behind-the-scenes docs, Battlestar Galactica deleted scenes, X Files outtakes and Shatner-vintage Star Trek.

Best of the web TV bunch, though (at least when you're suffering the 4pm blues at work), is Web Junk 20, in which VH1 rounds up the week's best virals and puts them on the telly. And then stick the whole series back on the web. See a Russian chihuahua humping an orange soft toy! See a Russian chihuahua humping an orange soft toy again! And again! (etc)

Back with Doctor Who, you may wish to know that the Beeb has unveiled the cover design for the Christmas Invasion DVD, which will also contain New Earth, first episode of the upcoming new series. Release date is 1 May.

Five to watch this week:

Masterchef Goes Large, Fri 17 March, BBC2, 6.30pm
Forget comedy swearing boy Ramsay: if you want tension in the kitchen, this is it. Tonight's the grand final.

Everybody Hates Chris, Sun 19 March, 8pm
A double-bill intro to Chris Rock's hit US sitcom.

V: The Mini series, from Mon 20 March, SciFi, nightly at 10.10pm (rpt 1.50am)
Legendary sci-fi series about alien visitors who hide a deadly secret.

Green Wing, from Mon 20 March, C4, nightly at 11.05pm
Repeating the first series of the surreal soap-comedy-drama that's basically Scrubs in Smack the Pony form.

The Apprentice, Weds 22 March, BBC2, 9pm
Private jet hire blah blah you're fired blah blah. Paul line of the week: "Their noodles... are made with poodles."


Other stories you might like

  • Despite global uncertainty, $500m hit doesn't rattle Nvidia execs
    CEO acknowledges impact of war, pandemic but says fundamentals ‘are really good’

    Nvidia is expecting a $500 million hit to its global datacenter and consumer business in the second quarter due to COVID lockdowns in China and Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Despite those and other macroeconomic concerns, executives are still optimistic about future prospects.

    "The full impact and duration of the war in Ukraine and COVID lockdowns in China is difficult to predict. However, the impact of our technology and our market opportunities remain unchanged," said Jensen Huang, Nvidia's CEO and co-founder, during the company's first-quarter earnings call.

    Those two statements might sound a little contradictory, including to some investors, particularly following the stock selloff yesterday after concerns over Russia and China prompted Nvidia to issue lower-than-expected guidance for second-quarter revenue.

    Continue reading
  • Another AI supercomputer from HPE: Champollion lands in France
    That's the second in a week following similar system in Munich also aimed at researchers

    HPE is lifting the lid on a new AI supercomputer – the second this week – aimed at building and training larger machine learning models to underpin research.

    Based at HPE's Center of Excellence in Grenoble, France, the new supercomputer is to be named Champollion after the French scholar who made advances in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs in the 19th century. It was built in partnership with Nvidia using AMD-based Apollo computer nodes fitted with Nvidia's A100 GPUs.

    Champollion brings together HPC and purpose-built AI technologies to train machine learning models at scale and unlock results faster, HPE said. HPE already provides HPC and AI resources from its Grenoble facilities for customers, and the broader research community to access, and said it plans to provide access to Champollion for scientists and engineers globally to accelerate testing of their AI models and research.

    Continue reading
  • Workday nearly doubles losses as waves of deals pushed back
    Figures disappoint analysts as SaaSy HR and finance application vendor navigates economic uncertainty

    HR and finance application vendor Workday's CEO, Aneel Bhusri, confirmed deal wins expected for the three-month period ending April 30 were being pushed back until later in 2022.

    The SaaS company boss was speaking as Workday recorded an operating loss of $72.8 million in its first quarter [PDF] of fiscal '23, nearly double the $38.3 million loss recorded for the same period a year earlier. Workday also saw revenue increase to $1.43 billion in the period, up 22 percent year-on-year.

    However, the company increased its revenue guidance for the full financial year. It said revenues would be between $5.537 billion and $5.557 billion, an increase of 22 percent on earlier estimates.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022