'Get two million page hits and I'll do three-in-a-bed'

Girlfriend's reckless website challenge


Girlfriends beware: if you're going to taunt your boyfriend with not measuring up in the website department, do not under any circumstances offer to engage in sexual liaison with him and another woman if he does, after all, rise to the occassion.

And who, you might ask, would be so foolish to agree to form the beast with three backs if, for instance, her boyf managed to create a website from nothing and achieve a climactic two million hits? Allison, that's who - the other half of the man behind helpwinmybet.com. Read on:

So, here's the story... I said to my girlfriend that any stupid website could get tons of hits, simply because people are bored all the time. She said that I was an idiot and couldn’t make a website that could get tons of hits if I wanted to. After a long argument (mostly centered around the fact that she called me an idiot) we made a bet:

If I could not make a website to get 2,000,000 hits, I would agree that I was an idiot; however, if I could make a website to get 2,000,000 hits, she would have a menage a trois (that's a threesome to you non french-speakers) with me and another girl. I thought she was kidding at the time, but then she said she was so sure of herself, that she would even put it in writing. This of course is an ultra-binding contract.

Yes, that's right, as we publish this the hits counter is at 2,358,611 and rising rapidly. By our reckoning, that's a quick ménage-à-trois with enough page impressions left over for Jim to demand the whole thing is videotaped for posterity. Well done that man. ®

Bootnote

Seems there may be more (or less) to this website than meets the eye:

Dear Lester, I was referred to this site yesterday by a friend of mine (the usual word of mouth thing). Howver, I was slightly concerned by the unprofessional look and format of the page; I was therefore overly cautious about clicking on things on it.

Which turned out to be a good thing!

If you look at the link properties for his links to metrodate.com and gamefly.com (well, the gamefly link is gone, but it did the same thing yesterday), the actual href link takes you through a redirection website! I looked up the owner of the sites that the links redirect through and came across a company named: ValueClick.com, an online advertising firm.

Now, this was before the statements listed for April 5 were posted. He has since stated that he is getting a financial bonus for signing people up for metrodate.com. However, with a click-through redirection system, he's actually making money from people simply clicking on the link to metrodate (not from having them sign up!).

Personally, I feel that this is horribly unscrupulous and dishonest!

Please warn your readers not to click his links!

Thank you for your time, Dave

PS. Also of note, "Jim" seems to be a screen name for this endeavor; the site is actually registered to a gentleman by the name of Brent Williams. But that's understandable.

Yes indeed. Consider yourselves informed and warned.


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