Going, going, Goggin

One of ComReg trio bites the dust


Chairperson of the Commission for Communications Regulation Isolde Goggin in effect resigned her position on Wednesday.

Goggin's four-year term as one of the three ComReg commissioners was due to end in December, and it is understood Goggin has written to Communications Minister Noel Dempsey to request that she is not considered for nomination for another term.

The Minister was in Vietnam at the time of publication and was unavailable for comment, according to his department.

Commissioner Mike Byrne, who currently has responsibility for consumer affairs within ComReg, is expected to be nominated for the top post.

Speaking with ENN en route to an Ofcom conference in London, Goggin said she decided to give up her post at ComReg in order to pursue other interests.

"I want to do other stuff. I've nothing lined up at the moment and I'm going to take some time off over Christmas," she said.

"Over the four years we've had to tackle complicated issues such as wholesale line rental...things didn't all work out but things are in place now to make it happen," she said. "It's been a very interesting and a very challenging job."

Goggin was responsible for regulatory and technological innovation in the telecommunications sector, as well as the evolution of regulation of postal services in Ireland. This brief included the revision of ComReg's spectrum strategy, new initiatives in the wireless licensing area, and the promotion of Ireland as a test bed for new uses of communication frequencies.

Prior to her role at ComReg, Goggin worked at the Competition Authority between 1996 and 2002. From 1991 to 1996 she was a business manager with Ericsson Systems Expertise, a Dun Laoghaire-based subsidiary of the Swedish multinational telecommunications company.

Prior to that, from 1989 to 1991, Goggin worked in DG XIII (now the Information Society directorate general) of the European Commission where she acted as a consultant to the Satellite Policy Unit.

Goggin's first jobs were with Telecom Eireann (now Eircom) in its engineering and later its commercial divisions.

Eircom has been perhaps the one company that ComReg has engaged with the most in the past four years as the former state-owned telco still owns the country's core telecommunications trunk network, a legacy possession which its competitors claim gives the company unfair advantage.

In this respect Goggin's tenure at the head of ComReg has been at arguably the most controversial time in the Commission's short history.

The forthcoming Communications and Miscellaneous Provisions bill - expected before the next general election - has been tentatively welcomed by the telecommunivations sector in Ireland, and indeed the commission itself, as it is supposed to give ComReg greater co-competition and enforcement powers.

Copyright © 2006, ENN


Other stories you might like

  • James Webb Space Telescope has arrived at its new home – an orbit almost a million miles from Earth

    Funnily enough, that's where we want to be right now, too

    The James Webb Space Telescope, the largest and most complex space observatory built by NASA, has reached its final destination: L2, the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point, an orbit located about a million miles away.

    Mission control sent instructions to fire the telescope's thrusters at 1400 EST (1900 UTC) on Monday. The small boost increased its speed by about 3.6 miles per hour to send it to L2, where it will orbit the Sun in line with Earth for the foreseeable future. It takes about 180 days to complete an L2 orbit, Amber Straughn, deputy project scientist for Webb Science Communications at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, said during a live briefing.

    "Webb, welcome home!" blurted NASA's Administrator Bill Nelson. "Congratulations to the team for all of their hard work ensuring Webb's safe arrival at L2 today. We're one step closer to uncovering the mysteries of the universe. And I can't wait to see Webb's first new views of the universe this summer."

    Continue reading
  • LG promises to make home appliance software upgradeable to take on new tasks

    Kids: empty the dishwasher! We can’t, Dad, it’s updating its OS to handle baked on grime from winter curries

    As the right to repair movement gathers pace, Korea’s LG has decided to make sure that its whitegoods can be upgraded.

    The company today announced a scheme called “Evolving Appliances For You.”

    The plan is sketchy: LG has outlined a scenario in which a customer who moves to a locale with climate markedly different to their previous home could use LG’s ThingQ app to upgrade their clothes dryer with new software that makes the appliance better suited to prevailing conditions and to the kind of fabrics you’d wear in a hotter or colder climes. The drier could also get new hardware to handle its new location. An image distributed by LG shows off the ability to change the tune a dryer plays after it finishes a load.

    Continue reading
  • IBM confirms new mainframe to arrive ‘late’ in first half of 2022

    Hybrid cloud is Big Blue's big bet, but big iron is predicted to bring a welcome revenue boost

    IBM has confirmed that a new model of its Z Series mainframes will arrive “late in the first half” of 2022 and emphasised the new device’s debut as a source of improved revenue for the company’s infrastructure business.

    CFO James Kavanaugh put the release on the roadmap during Big Blue’s Q4 2021 earnings call on Monday. The CFO suggested the new release will make a positive impact on IBM’s revenue, which came in at $16.7 billion for the quarter and $57.35bn for the year. The Q4 number was up 6.5 per cent year on year, the annual number was a $2.2bn jump.

    Kavanaugh mentioned the mainframe because revenue from the big iron was down four points in the quarter, a dip that Big Blue attributed to the fact that its last mainframe – the Z15 – emerged in 2019 and the sales cycle has naturally ebbed after eleven quarters of sales. But what a sales cycle it was: IBM says the Z15 has done better than its predecessor and seen shipments that can power more MIPS (Millions of Instructions Per Second) than in any previous program in the company’s history*.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022