Swedes battle to name daughter Metallica

Authorites unrocked by 'inappropriate' moniker


A Swedish couple is battling the country's National Tax Authority for the right to call their daughter "Metallica", the BBC reports.

In Sweden, both first names and surnames have to be officially approved. On the banned list are "offensive, unsuitable or inappropriate" titles, as well as those which might "cause discomfort for the one using it".

Michael and Karolina Tomaro have already baptised the six-month-old headbanger but, despite a ruling by Goteburg's County Administrative Court that there was "no reason to block the name", came unstuck when they "tried to register the name with tax authorities before applying for a passport". Officials didn't much like the Metallica tag, and sent the case to a higher court for consideration.

Karolina Tomaro bemoaned: "We've had to cancel trips and can't get anywhere because we can't get her a passport without an approved name."

Other names which have in the past fallen foul of Sweden's vetting process include "Ikea" and "Veranda", the Beeb notes. "Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116" (pronounced Albin, in case you were wondering) also got the bum's rush back in 1996, when a boy's parents tried it on "as a protest against Swedish naming laws".

Sadly, though, some poor Swedish kid is called Oliver Google Kai. Nobody objected back in 2005 when search engine expert Kelias Kai and his wife Carol slapped the poor blighter with this inspired choice of middle name. ®


Other stories you might like

  • US won’t prosecute ‘good faith’ security researchers under CFAA
    Well, that clears things up? Maybe not.

    The US Justice Department has directed prosecutors not to charge "good-faith security researchers" with violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) if their reasons for hacking are ethical — things like bug hunting, responsible vulnerability disclosure, or above-board penetration testing.

    Good-faith, according to the policy [PDF], means using a computer "solely for purposes of good-faith testing, investigation, and/or correction of a security flaw or vulnerability."

    Additionally, this activity must be "carried out in a manner designed to avoid any harm to individuals or the public, and where the information derived from the activity is used primarily to promote the security or safety of the class of devices, machines, or online services to which the accessed computer belongs, or those who use such devices, machines, or online services."

    Continue reading
  • Intel plans immersion lab to chill its power-hungry chips
    AI chips are sucking down 600W+ and the solution could be to drown them.

    Intel this week unveiled a $700 million sustainability initiative to try innovative liquid and immersion cooling technologies to the datacenter.

    The project will see Intel construct a 200,000-square-foot "mega lab" approximately 20 miles west of Portland at its Hillsboro campus, where the chipmaker will qualify, test, and demo its expansive — and power hungry — datacenter portfolio using a variety of cooling tech.

    Alongside the lab, the x86 giant unveiled an open reference design for immersion cooling systems for its chips that is being developed by Intel Taiwan. The chip giant is hoping to bring other Taiwanese manufacturers into the fold and it'll then be rolled out globally.

    Continue reading
  • US recovers a record $15m from the 3ve ad-fraud crew
    Swiss banks cough up around half of the proceeds of crime

    The US government has recovered over $15 million in proceeds from the 3ve digital advertising fraud operation that cost businesses more than $29 million for ads that were never viewed.

    "This forfeiture is the largest international cybercrime recovery in the history of the Eastern District of New York," US Attorney Breon Peace said in a statement

    The action, Peace added, "sends a powerful message to those involved in cyber fraud that there are no boundaries to prosecuting these bad actors and locating their ill-gotten assets wherever they are in the world."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022