House-trash party girl blames 'hackers'

MySpace invite turned family home into bomb site


An English teenager whose house was trashed after she posted a party invite on MySpace has blamed computer hackers for the gatecrashing debacle.

A 17 year old from Houghton-le-Spring, near Sunderland, took advantage of her parents being away over Easter to invite a few friends – say 60, plus DJs – to an informal get together at the family home, according to reports.

Being a modern kind of a girl, she informed her friends via MySpace. Her page, which has now been removed, apparently warned potential attendees that booze would probably run out quick so “bring more drink” as well as “squirty cream”.

Well, it was inevitable…apparently coachloads of aimless youth turned up from as far away as London. Accoring to www.thisislondon.com, by the next morning gatecrashers had filled the bath with the family’s crockery, the shower with empty booze bottles, urinated on her mother’s wedding dress and dyed her younger brother’s clothes, which they’d deemed chavvy. Damage has been put at around £20,000.

Apparently the shamed hostess has yet to return home, while her family are seeking alternative temporary accommodation.

London’s Evening Standard tracked down the now extremely repentant teen, who explained that her MySpace page had been hijacked by the cyber gatecrashers, who’d changed her innocent original invite to a few friends – well, 60 - to a call to trash an “average family sized house” in a bacchanalian style rout.

The hacking claim has been met with incredulity from posters on bulletin boards, who asked why the girl hadn’t noticed the changes. The most cynical suggest the entire thing was cooked up as a launchpad to internet stardom via MySpace and YouTube.

If this was anyone's aim, it didn't work. A thorough search of YouTube reveals no footage of the party - even when we included the term "squirty cream". ®


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