IBM to buy DataMirror for $161m

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IBM plans on purchasing Ontario-based data protection firm DataMirror for approximately $161m. IBM will pay cash for the company, acquiring all outstanding stock for $25.88 per share.

DataMirror produces data protection and auditing software for different types of applications, databases, operating systems and hardware platforms. The software moves high volumes of data directly between relational databases, message queues and other data stores. The company has approximately 220 employees and more than 2,200 customers including FedEx Ground, First American Bank, Tiffany & Co. and Union Pacific Railroad.

IBM will integrate DataMirror software with IBM's Information Management Software and its information integration platform, Information Server. DataMirror technology will also be used to bring real-time event capture to IBM services.

"Organizations need the ability to capture and use information in real-time to help them make better business decisions, better serve their customers and increase operational efficiencies," IBM exec Ambuj Goyal said in a statement.

The acquisition is still subject to shareholder and regulatory approvals, as well as other standard closing conditions. The sale is expected to be finalized in the third calendar quarter of 2007.

DataMirror joins Big Blue's steady supply of small company digestion to fill-out their software portfolio. Last month, IBM announced it will purchase Massachusetts-based security firm Watchfire for an undisclosed sum and Swedish data lifecycle management company, Telelogic, for $747m.

$1.4bn contract extension

IBM also announced today a $1.4bn, seven-year outsourcing agreement with London drug maker AstraZeneca. IBM said it will manage IT services for AstraZeneca across its global organizations for about seven years.

Someone please prep the welcome doughnuts. ®

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