Emerging markets drive mobile shipments

Asia, Pacific and Africa spur 11% growth


A total of 258 million mobile phones were shipped worldwide in the second quarter, up 11 per cent on the same period in 2006. That's according to a Strategy Analytics, which reveals that the number of handsets shipped globally rose by four per cent from 247 million units in the first quarter of 2007.

Overall, global shipments exceeded a record half billion units during the first half of the year with demand proving particularly healthy in emerging markets.

Nokia sold 101 million handsets during the second quarter to give it a record 39 per cent global share. The Finnish firm made significant gains in Asia Pacific, Africa, and China during the three-month period and Strategy Analytics analysts predict that the company will pass the 40 per cent market share threshold during the second half of 2007.

Motorola's current crisis worsened during the quarters as both shipments and margins fell. As if things couldn't get worse, the mobile manufacturer found itself slipping into third place in terms of market share at the expense of Samsung, which registered a record 37 million handset sales during the second quarter.

Samsung now has 15 per cent market share, its biggest ever slice of the pie. However, while the firm saw volumes rise during the second quarter, value was down, with ASPs (average selling prices) falling five per cent sequentially and operating margin slipping eight per cent.

During the three month period, Motorola shipments plunged to 36 million units. Its global share is now 14 per cent, which is back to the pre-RAZR levels of 2003. Strategy Analytics analysts claim that a lacklustre 3G portfolio and a weak GSM line-up across mid- and high-tiers remain the firm's biggest weaknesses.

Sony Ericsson saw its global market share reach its highest level since the merger between Sony and Ericsson back in 2001. The company now has a 10 per cent share and with a 59 per cent annual shipment growth, it is still the fastest-growing firm among the top five mobile manufacturers.

Rounding out the top five is LG, which saw handset volume increase by 25 per cent during the second quarter, its best performance over the past 12 months. Operating margin for LG rose by five per cent to 11 per cent compared to the preceding quarter.

Meanwhile, Apple, which has been hogging the headlines since the launch of its iPhone in June, shipped 270,000 units in the US during the second quarter, to get on the global map for a tiny 0.1 per cent market share.

Strategy Analytics predicts that Apple will push toward a one per cent quarterly share by the end of 2007 and is capable of overtaking the likes of Panasonic, Sharp and Sagem to become one of the leading mobile manufacturers providing it can successfully expand its distribution channels outside the US.

Looking ahead to the third quarter, Strategy Analytics forecasts 283 million mobiles will be sold during the three month period.

© 2007 ENN

Similar topics

Narrower topics


Other stories you might like

  • ESA boss gives update on stricken Sentinel-1B imaging satellite: All is not lost yet

    Still borked, 1C and 1D are waiting in the wings

    ESA Director General Josef Aschbacher has addressed the issue of the space agency's borked Copernicus Sentinel-1B spacecraft in his first annual press conference.

    The last useful bit of data from the Earth observation satellite came last year, and as of yesterday attempts to revive the equipment to normal working order have come to naught.

    It's an interesting anomaly: the spacecraft remains under control and, according to Aschbacher, "the thermal control system is properly working and the regular orbit control manoeuvres are routinely performed." However, attempts to reactivate the power unit that's holding back the transmission of image data have proven unsuccessful.

    Continue reading
  • Tesla driver charged with vehicular manslaughter after deadly Autopilot crash

    Prosecution seems to be first of its kind in America

    A Tesla driver has seemingly become the first person in the US to be charged with vehicular manslaughter for a deadly crash in which the vehicle's Autopilot mode was engaged.

    According to the cops, the driver exited a highway in his Tesla Model S, ran a red light, and smashed into a Honda Civic at an intersection in Gardena, Los Angeles County, in late 2019. A man and woman in the second car were killed. The Tesla driver and a passenger survived and were taken to hospital.

    Prosecutors in California charged Kevin George Aziz Riad, 27, in October last year though details of the case are only just emerging, according to AP on Tuesday. Riad, a limousine service driver, is facing two counts of vehicular manslaughter, and is free on bail after pleading not guilty.

    Continue reading
  • AMD returns to smartphone graphics with new Samsung chip for your pocket computer

    We're back in black

    AMD's GPU technology is returning to mobile handsets with Samsung's Exynos 2200 system-on-chip, which was announced on Tuesday.

    The Exynos 2200 processor, fabricated using a 4nm process, has Armv9 CPU cores and the oddly named Xclipse GPU, which is an adaptation of AMD's RDNA 2 mainstream GPU architecture.

    AMD was in the handheld GPU market until 2009, when it sold the Imageon GPU and handheld business for $65m to Qualcomm, which turned the tech into the Adreno GPU for its Snapdragon family. AMD's Imageon processors were used in devices from Motorola, Panasonic, Palm and others making Windows Mobile handsets.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022