Tech gets steamier with mp3 vibrators and strap-on kit

And idiots break themselves against martial artists


It turns out that Bulgarian airbags are not bee-proof. A Taiwanese woman was riding her motorbike while wearing a low-cut dress, when a bee kamikazed her right breast implant. The fun-bag proceeded to disappear over the course of two days, but has since been replaced. You got straight to the meat of the issue:

It's always nice to be kept abreast of recent developments, i predict "apine proof" bulgarian air bags on the market forthwith.

Edward Fingleton


Not sure I'm buying the whole "put the incident down to the fact that she was “very skinny” which meant the skin on her breasts was therefore very thin and prone to puncturing"

The Skin (even on thin people) is a few mm thick and the container would also be quite thick too so I doubting that a bee sting would be up to the job. Perhaps a Queen Wasp or Hornett.

What also needs to be taken in to consideration is the internal PSI of the breast plumper.

Sounds like it was a bit of a dodgy installation I hope she got a free replacement/ upgrade.

Anon


Whre are the goddamn pictures ?!?! Another Bulgarian air bag story with no salacious images. WTF ????

Steve


I was going to question the relevance of this story being here, but for the bee to have done what it did there must have been a point to it after all.

I'd get me coat, but there's a queue at the cloakroom.....

TeeCee


No-one seems too concerned about the fate of the poor old insect. Presumably he got mashed by the motorcycling mammaries? What a way to go.

Anon


A highly ironic refund is no doubt due; surely the whole *point* of getting Bulgarian airbags is that you're fed up with your bee stings in the first place?

/coat

Anon


We recently covered the Defence Systems & Equipment International Exhibition 2007, and one gem that really caught your fancy was the strap-on stealth jetplane. It's no flying car, but it definitely looks like a fun ride. You thought so too:

Please sir... can I have one.... with the added rocket booster packs, sir!?!

i wan' it, I wan' it I waaaaaaaaan' it!!

Absolutely, positively serious offer to be a human guinea pig (test pilot) for the Rocko-Gryphon(tm - by me, thanks) - Only compensation required woud be 2 of said Rocko-Gryphon(tm) and a life time supply of disposible rockets... a fair deal all round I think.

Nathan Billett


Aw c'mon. Us poor paraglider types got enough to put up with wings that can collapse, people strapping lawn mower engines to their backs, mad beggers tying balloons to their chairs... and now some loon wants to drive a stealthed mini-jet through the sky?

I hope he's read the Air Navigation Order - if he's got power, *he* has to give way to *us*.

Yours watching the sky even harder,

Neil


As detectable as a bird. Everyone always says that about stealth fighters and the like:

A) Unless radars are operating as enormous power levels, and microwave frequencies (hot dogs anyone?), how is a non-metalic thin cloth parachute visible at all?

B) Do birds often fly at 30k ft or several hundred kts? If the radars can detect them at all, shouldn't those charateristics be enough to flag them?

Brent Gardner


Let me see... it barely appears on radar, can follow terrain in ground-hugging mode, and is about six feet long. How long before some poor beta tester is picked off by automatic anti-missile defences, like wot the Americans are always proposing...?

Ian Ferguson


[I call] prior art. I believe batman came up with that idea first.

Anon.


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