PC shipments set to jump

Notebooks and laptops show biggest growth


Worldwide PC shipments are expected to rise by 12.6 per cent this year, according to new research by analysts IDC. The projected figure of 257.5 million units is up on IDC's prediction in June, which estimated growth of 12.2 per cent in 2007.

The rise in the number of units shipped is being led by notebooks and laptops which are expected to increase shipments by 28 per cent this year. IDC expects single digit growth for desktop PCs.

The Asia and Pacific region, excluding Japan, is driving the analysts' raised expectations. IDC said strong growth during the second quarter showed relentless adoption of consumer portable PCs and gains in desktop and commercial markets in the region.

In contrast, the US, Western Europe, and Japan adjusted expectations for 2007 and 2008 slightly downward, pushing some growth into 2009. IDC expects this change in growth patterns to shift the focus of the sector to less developed markets. IDC expects the Asia and Pacific region to surpass Western Europe in total PC shipment volume in 2007 and pass the US in 2009.

"Overall, we should expect to see strong growth for the next several years, with double-digit increases expected through 2009," said Loren Loverde, director of IDC's Worldwide Quarterly PC Tracker. "The shift to mobility will continue to drive growth, as portable PCs are expected to represent more than 50 per cent of shipment value during 2007 and more than half of worldwide volume by 2009."

Copyright © 2007 ENN

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