Vista Business sales soar like leaping dachshund

Say XP, XP won't you die for me


August numbers are in from Context, the European PC market watcher, and they show that the Vista is anything but Buena for Microsoft. Vista Business, the, um, business version of Vista, Microsoft's new operating system, slowed during the month, to grab a measly 13 per cent of unit PC sales through Europe's top IT disties.

Maybe, the customers were all on holiday that month - you know how continental Europeans love to take August off. And July too...a month in which Vista Business accounted for 17 per cent of unit PC sales. In other words, Vista Business peddling is pedaling backwards, while sales of XP, Microsoft's ever-so 20th century operating system, appear to be stabilising. Unit sales of Windows XP Professional PCs dropped four points to 27 per cent in August compared with July. But as Context helpfully notes, they remain double Vista Business sales, leaving "XP professional appearing still to be the business operating system of choice".

Windows XP sales in the retail channel are falling through the floor, while sales of Vista Home Premium, are kinda rocketing. Since the consumer peons have little choice in the flavour of Windows that come with their PCs, and it would require a certain resourcefulness and eccentricity to seek out a new PC equipped with Windows XP Home and Media Center, this is not exactly earth shattering news. On any level.

In January 2007, prior to the Vista launch, XP Home accounted for 28 per cent of unit sales, while XP Pro soaked up 45 per cent. By May, XP Home PC unit sales through the distribution channel fell to nine per cent, while Vista Basic and Home Premium gobbled up 36 per cent and XP Professional at 28 per cent. ®

Context release

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