Sun spikes Java IDEs

NetBeans or bust


Sun Microsystems is finally giving up building its own Java integrated tools suites after a long and painful slog.

Development of Sun Java Studio Creator, launched amid much hype three years ago as the new force in visual-drag-and-drop, interface development, and the stately Studio Enterprise are to be discontinued, the company told El Reg. There's no word on Sun Studio for C, C++, and Fortran.

Sun is also turning the classic vendor migration campaign guns on its own users, with a push to persuade developers of both its IDEs to adopt NetBeans 6.0.

Sun is offering six months' free help migrating to NetBeans 6.0, which is probably a comment on the small number of developers actively working with Sun's IDEs. Sun has promised to honor customer support contracts "for a long time".

The irony is that in summer 2006 Sun was trying to convince users of JBuilder from rival Borland Software to migrate, as Borland was giving up on developers and riding off into the Texas sunset. Initially, it had seemed Sun's latest migration program was, again, targeted at Java IDE rivals.

Sun has poured untold dollars and hours into product development and marketing of its Java tools. The company has also dabbled with various support and pricing options.

Unfortunately, though, it seems this was not enough to reverse the missteps of the last decade when Sun was caught napping in the early days of Java.

More recently, Sun has been giving away more of its IDEs while placing greater emphasis on NetBeans, which seems to be finding its feet among developers with version 6.0 that was released last week.

In April 2006, Sun released Studio Enterprise's UML modeller, XML infrastructure tools, and orchestration and SOA tools to the NetBeans project as part of the NetBeans Enterprise Pack for use with NetBeans 5.5. That Enterprise Pack is now available with the Visual Web Pack as a single installation with NetBeans 6.0.

According to Sun, it's the confusion created by having multiple environments and plug ins that's caused the consolidation on NetBeans.

A company spokesperson said: "Sun has been listening to feedback from customers and the community who have been saying that though these tools are great, they would like just one IDE." ®


Other stories you might like

  • Ex-Qualcomm Snapdragon chief turns CEO at AI chip startup MemryX

    Meet the new boss

    A former executive leading Qualcomm's Snapdragon computing platforms has darted the company to become CEO at an AI chip startup.

    Keith Kressin will lead product commercialization for MemryX, which was founded in 2019 and makes memory-intensive AI chiplets.

    The company is now out of stealth mode and will soon commercially ship its AI chips to non-tech customers. The company was testing early generations of its chips with industries including auto and robotics.

    Continue reading
  • Aircraft can't land safely due to interference with upcoming 5G C-band broadband service

    Expect flight delays and diversions, US Federal Aviation Administation warns

    The new 5G C-band wireless broadband service expected to rollout on 5 January 2022 in the US will disrupt local radio signals and make it difficult for airplanes to land safely in harsh weather conditions, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

    Pilots rely on radio altimeter readings to figure out when and where an aircraft should carry out a series of operations to prepare for touchdown. But the upcoming 5G C-band service beaming from cell towers threatens to interfere with these signals, the FAA warned in two reports.

    Flights may have to be delayed or restricted at certain airports as the new broadband service comes into effect next year. The change could affect some 6,834 airplanes and 1,828 helicopters. The cost to operators is expected to be $580,890.

    Continue reading
  • Canadian charged with running ransomware attack on US state of Alaska

    Cross-border op nabbed our man, boast cops and prosecutors

    A Canadian man is accused of masterminding ransomware attacks that caused "damage" to systems belonging to the US state of Alaska.

    A federal indictment against Matthew Philbert, 31, of Ottawa, was unsealed yesterday, and he was also concurrently charged by the Canadian authorities with a number of other criminal offences at the same time. US prosecutors [PDF] claimed he carried out "cyber related offences" – including a specific 2018 attack on a computer in Alaska.

    The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reported that Philbert was charged after a 23 month investigation "that also involved the [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, federal enforcers], the FBI and Europol."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021