Cameron blames Labour naivety for NHS IT woes

We don't need NPfIT, we need Google


Tory leader David Cameron used a speech in Trafford yesterday to make another attempt to gain credibility for his party's management of the NHS.

He blamed the government for falling for the sales pitches of big IT providers and called for more local solutions to NHS IT problems.

Cameron said: "It's one of the most shameful and disgraceful aspects of Labour's record: the way they fall for the sales patter of the management consultants and the big IT firms, who make them think they can cut corners to success.

"Spend a few million on these consultants, they're told, a few billion on this computer project, and everything will be ok. Well, it isn't."

He said: "The NHS is suffering from the shoddy jargon-ridden schemes served up on PowerPoint and swallowed whole by the people who are supposed to be custodians of the health service and custodians of taxpayers' money." Cameron repeated his call for an NHS constitution - and welcomed Gordon Brown's support for the idea.

While we were told that the big IT providers were bad, Cameron did big up the role of his friends at Google: "Today Google has three million medical articles online, there for public viewing and easy searching - far more information than any doctor can carry in his head."

Cameron said much knowledge was being added by patients themselves - and "distributed horizontally from patient to patient".

It is this evolution, Cameron claimed, which undermines the need for a huge, central database of medical records.

Cameron said: "And it's this horizontal diffusion of knowledge that makes me so confident we can do better than the Government's proposal for a vast, centralised, NHS database. Surely, recent events have shown how dangerous government IT systems are - just think of the potential for disaster when everyone's health records are stored centrally."

The Tory leader added that records should be kept locally under the protection of the patient's GP.

The full speech is available here. ®


Other stories you might like

  • Apple wins Epic court ruling: Devs will pay up for now as legal case churns on

    Previous injunction that ordered company to allow non-Apple payments systems is suspended

    Apple will not be required to implement third-party in-app payments systems for its App Store by 9 December, after a federal appeals court temporarily suspended the initial ruling on Wednesday.

    As part of its ongoing legal spat with Epic, a judge from the Northern District Court of California said Apple wasn’t a monopoly, but agreed it’s ability to swipe up to a 30 per cent fee in sales processed in iOS apps was uncompetitive. Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ordered an injunction, giving the iGiant 90 days to let developers add links or buttons in their apps to direct users to third-party purchasing systems.

    Those 90 days were set to end on 9 December. If developers were allowed to process financial transactions using external systems they wouldn’t have to hand over their profits to Apple, they argued. When Apple tried to file for a motion to stay, which would pause the injunction until it filed an appeal, Rogers denied its request.

    Continue reading
  • Meg Whitman – former HP and eBay CEO – nominated as US ambassador to Kenya

    Donated $110K to Democrats in recent years

    United States president Joe Biden has announced his intention to nominate former HPE and eBay CEO Meg Whitman as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the Republic of Kenya.

    The Biden administration's announcement of the planned nomination reminds us that Whitman has served as CEO of eBay, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Quibi. Whitman also serves on the boards of Procter & Gamble, and General Motors.

    The announcement doesn't remind readers that Whitman has form as a Republican politician – she ran for governor of California in 2010, then backed the GOP's Mitt Romney in his 2008 and 2012 bids for the presidency. She later switched political allegiance and backed the presidential campaigns of both Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden.

    Continue reading
  • Ex-Qualcomm Snapdragon chief turns CEO at AI chip startup MemryX

    Meet the new boss

    A former executive leading Qualcomm's Snapdragon computing platforms has departed the company to become CEO at an AI chip startup.

    Keith Kressin will lead product commercialization for MemryX, which was founded in 2019 and makes memory-intensive AI chiplets.

    The company is now out of stealth mode and will soon commercially ship its AI chips to non-tech customers. The company was testing early generations of its chips with industries including auto and robotics.

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021