Junkie sues pusher over heart attack

Crystal meth → coma → lawsuit


A Canadian former drug addict has successfully sued the dealer who supplied the crystal methamphetamine that triggered a heart attack and put her in a coma for 11 days, the Times reports.

Sandra Bergen, 23, of Biggar, Saskatchewan, alleged that "her nursery-school classmate Clinton Davey got her addicted to crystal methamphetamine by offering her a free dose when she was only 13 years old". She subsequently kicked the habit and had been drug-free for eight months until she met Davey at a friend's house in 2004, shortly before her 20th birthday.

She recounted: "Prior to taking the drug, I was very nervous because I had to appear in a sexual assault trial where I was the victim. So I was having a bad day, you might say. Usually what he does is he offers you some for free because he knows you are addicted. Once you have some, he offers to sell you some.

"He told me to go over to his grandmother's house. That's where I went. We did drugs together there. Then I got him money for the drugs... We smoked some. Then I had symptoms of a heart attack."

In her lawsuit, in which Bergen also named the unknown supplier "John Doe" who'd supplied the crystal meth to Davey, she said the latter was aware the the drug was highly addictive and its sale was "for the purpose of making money but was also for the purpose of intentionally inflicting physical and mental suffering on Sandra".

Davey filed a defence statement denying the allegations and stating that Bergen "did assume the risk to her person when she voluntarily ingested the illegal drugs".

However, Davey refused to name "John Doe" in pre-trial discovery, "putting him at risk of a contempt-of-court charge", and the judge duly entered a default judgment against him.

Bergen said of the lawsuit: "It's bigger than me and it's bigger than this guy. I think it's a different way to hit drug dealers financially, and that is where it would really hurt them. I have gotten sober. I think that's taking responsibility for my actions. I don't think I should have to take responsibility for both of our actions. I think he should meet me half way. That's what this lawsuit is about.”

Calvina Fay, director of the Drug Free America Foundation, said the case "could offer a new avenue to pursue drug dealers", adding: "This obviously sets a precedent, but it also makes the public aware of this whole concept. It's a way of holding drug dealers responsible for their actions."

Gwen Landolt, a lawyer and VP of the Drug Prevention Network of Canada, said such lawsuits "would be useful in reining in the drug trade", but cautioned that the case "hinged on an unusual set of facts and voiced scepticism that courts would routinely hold dealers responsible for drug-taking by users".

She concluded: "It could be very useful that there would be criminal and personal liability. But it's not the normal set of facts."

Damages against Davey will be decided at a future hearing, but although Bergen is claiming $50,000, she admitted: "I don't really expect to gain much financially." ®


Other stories you might like

  • US won’t prosecute ‘good faith’ security researchers under CFAA
    Well, that clears things up? Maybe not.

    The US Justice Department has directed prosecutors not to charge "good-faith security researchers" with violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) if their reasons for hacking are ethical — things like bug hunting, responsible vulnerability disclosure, or above-board penetration testing.

    Good-faith, according to the policy [PDF], means using a computer "solely for purposes of good-faith testing, investigation, and/or correction of a security flaw or vulnerability."

    Additionally, this activity must be "carried out in a manner designed to avoid any harm to individuals or the public, and where the information derived from the activity is used primarily to promote the security or safety of the class of devices, machines, or online services to which the accessed computer belongs, or those who use such devices, machines, or online services."

    Continue reading
  • Intel plans immersion lab to chill its power-hungry chips
    AI chips are sucking down 600W+ and the solution could be to drown them.

    Intel this week unveiled a $700 million sustainability initiative to try innovative liquid and immersion cooling technologies to the datacenter.

    The project will see Intel construct a 200,000-square-foot "mega lab" approximately 20 miles west of Portland at its Hillsboro campus, where the chipmaker will qualify, test, and demo its expansive — and power hungry — datacenter portfolio using a variety of cooling tech.

    Alongside the lab, the x86 giant unveiled an open reference design for immersion cooling systems for its chips that is being developed by Intel Taiwan. The chip giant is hoping to bring other Taiwanese manufacturers into the fold and it'll then be rolled out globally.

    Continue reading
  • US recovers a record $15m from the 3ve ad-fraud crew
    Swiss banks cough up around half of the proceeds of crime

    The US government has recovered over $15 million in proceeds from the 3ve digital advertising fraud operation that cost businesses more than $29 million for ads that were never viewed.

    "This forfeiture is the largest international cybercrime recovery in the history of the Eastern District of New York," US Attorney Breon Peace said in a statement

    The action, Peace added, "sends a powerful message to those involved in cyber fraud that there are no boundaries to prosecuting these bad actors and locating their ill-gotten assets wherever they are in the world."

    Continue reading

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022