Latest iPhone firmware unlocked

More jailbreaks than a spaghetti western


The latest version of the firmware for Apple's iPhone has fallen to hackers less than a week after its release.

Two hackers working separately have both succeeded in jailbreaking version 1.1.3 of the firmware, iPhone Atlas reports. One of the hacks requires hardware modification, so it's not suited for those of a nervous disposition or lacking in electronics expertise.

You can see the hack in action on this video:

Can't see the video? Then download Flash Player from Adobe.com

Another hack by Jonathan Zdziarski, developer of the NES emulator for iPhone, is software only but somewhat complicated. If previous experience is anything to go by, easier jailbreaks will emerge over coming days. ®

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